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NATHAN BLUMSTEIN and ESTHER VISHNICK

Nathan Bloomstein, who was a tailor, was born in Russia on June 2 in 1873 or 1874. He married Esther Vishnick (Vishnek), who was born in Warsaw, Russia on August 22, 1873. For more information about the genealogy of Esther Vishnick's parents and siblings, see our Vishnick Family page.

Nathan, Esther, and their eldest daughter Annie Bloomstein, who was born in Russia in 1894, immigrated from Russia to England somewhere between 1894 and 1896. The rest of their children, Phoebe, Nelly (Nellie), Harry, Minerva (also known as Mindel or Minnie), and Morris, were all born in London, England between 1899 and 1905.

The entire Bloomstein family voyaged together from Southampton, England on the S.S.St. Paul on July 22, 1905, and arrived at Ellis Island, New York on July 30, 1905. They were headed to meet their brother-in-law, a Mr. M. Greenbaum, who lived in Brooklyn, New York. They had moved to San Francisco by the time of the 1906 earthquake, after which they relocated across the San Francisco Bay to Oakland in Alameda County, California, and by the time of the 1920 census, had changed the spelling of their last name to Blumstein.

All of their children continued to live and work in California, where they married and had families, and you can read about their children below. If you wish to view our Blumstein family tree, then go to http://blumstein.tribalpages.com.

Nathan Blumstein passed away in Oakland, California on April 16, 1929. His wife Esther Blumstein passed away on July 12, 1965, also in Oakland. Both were buried in the Jewish Home of Eternity, Mountain View Cemetery, in Oakland, Alameda County, California.

If you know or are a member of the Blumstein family, please note that we are not mentioning, in this narrative, the names of people if they or their siblings are still living, in order to protect the privacy of the living. The family tree does, however, include the names of deceased relatives, whether or not they are survived by any living siblings. If you find any errors, or have more information you would like to see added to this narrative, please do contact us.

Annie Blumstein and Joseph Schoenfeld

Their daughter Annie Blumstein was born on May 15, 1894 in Russia. In about 1902, she married Joseph Schoenfeld, who was born in Hungary about 1887. Joseph was a merchant at a Mens' Haberdashery at the time of the 1930 Census. They had two sons in Oakland, California, Milton and Edwin, both of whom married and had children.

Their first son, Milton Schoenfeld, who was born on May 28, 1913, and worked in a variety of retail businesses, passed away in November 1983. Ed Schoenfeld, who was born on December 17, 1919, was a well-known sports writer for the Oakland Tribune, and and passed away on July 21, 2002. Milton and Edwin's father, Joseph Schoenfeld, passed away in November 1956, and their mother Annie Schoenfeld passed away on July 4, 1973.

Phoebe Blumstein and Mose Grossman

Phoebe Blumstein was born in Whitechapel, London, England on December 15, 1896. In about 1916, she married Mose Grossman, who was born about 1897. They had three children, all born in Oakland, California, all of whom married and had children. Phoebe Grossman passed away on May 3, 1946, and her husband Mose Grossman passed away on June 28, 1980. For more information about Mose and Phoebe Grossman, their children, and the rest of our Grossman family, read our Grossman Family Genealogy page.

Nellie Blumstein and Hymen Schwartz

Nellie Blumstein was born in London, England on November 8, 1898 and married Hymen Schwartz, who was born in San Francisco, California on September 7, 1898. Hymen owned and operated a Dry Cleaning business in Oakland, California. They had two children, Gerald, who was born in 1924 and passed away in January 2006, and Nadine, who was born in 1929 and passed away in December 2008. Both of them married and had children.

Nellie Schwartz passed away in Oakland, California on April 12, 1967, and her husband Hymen Schwartz passed away in Oakland, California on September 15, 1980.

Harry Blumstein and Frances

Nathan and Esther's son Harry Blumstein, who was born in Whitechapel, London, England on April 8, 1901. Harry changed his name to Harry Bloom, and was a travelling salesman in wholesale apparel sales. He and his wife Frances, who was born in Montana on November 19, 1906, had a family. Frances Bloom passed away on September 13, 1979 in Walnut Creek, California, and Harry passed away on December 31, 1983, in Concord, California.

Minnie Blumstein and Abe Rubin

Minerva Blumstein (Minnie) was born on January 27, 1903 in Whitechapel, London, England. She married Abe Rubin, who was born on August 22, 1901 in Chicago, Illinois, and was in the aluminum smelting business. They had two children in California, who both married and had children. Abe Rubin passed away on June 14, 1971, and Minnie Rubin passed away March 8, 1990.

Morris Blumstein and Laura Weinberg

Morris Blumstein, who also changed his last name to Bloom, was born in England on June 19, 1905, and passed away on July 6, 1992. Morrie Bloom married Laura Weinberg (Veinberg), who was born on August 14, 1909 and passed away on July 8, 2002. They had two daughters, each of whom married and have had families.

PUZZLE: THE GREENBAUMS

In 1905, the Bloomsteins were planning on meeting their brother-in-law, a Mr. M. Greenbaum, of 37 Monglonen Avenue in Brooklyn, New York. Who was Mr. Greenbaum? Which side of the family is he on? Was there a name change here, or is he the husband of a sister of either Esther Vishnick or Nathan Bloomstein? Was there a Monglonen Avenue in Brooklyn, or was the address they gave garbled when they told the officials or showed them the address?

We are researching the Census and other records for answers. There is a Morris Greenbaum, who was a tailor of vests and lived in Brooklyn, New York on Humboldt Street in 1900, and then on Vernon Avenue in 1910. Both he and his wife Minnie Greenbaum say they are from Hungary. Their children Samuel (Daniel), Emil, Solomon, Rosie (Rose), and Lena all were born in New York.

There also is a Max Greenbaum, who was a tailor of cloaks and vests, and who lived on Graham Avenue in Brooklyn, New York, with his wife Pauline Greenbaum and their children. Although born in Russia, they were Polish and spoke Yiddish. Max and Pauline Greenbaum, and their daughters Mollie, Rosie, Eva, and Annie Greenbaum, all were born in Russia before the family came to the United States in 1902. Their daughter Ida Greenbaum was born in New York.

There are other Max Greenbaums and Morris Greenbaums in Brooklyn, but we are researching these first as their street names seem the ones most likely to have been rendered as Monglonen.

There also is the possibility that they were headed to meet relatives in Brooklyn Township, California, which is now in the Oakland area. Quite a few relatives lived in Brooklyn Township at that time, and maybe the clerk recording their destination simply assumed it was Brooklyn, New York, rather than California.

We found a Morris and Mary Greenbaum in San Francisco in 1900. This Morris Greenbaum was a tailor born in Russia in 1865, his wife Mary was born in Louisiana in 1870, and their son Joseph Greenbaum was born in New York in September 1888. People often moved to and from San Francisco and Oakland at that time, but we have not yet been able to find further information on members of this particular Greenbaum family.

If you wish to see the notes I have been taking while searching for Greenbaum obituaries in the New York Times, check out our New York Times Obituary Summaries page. We still have not found our Greenbaum cousins, but we will keep hunting for them!

Any and all leads or information to help solve this puzzle and locate the Greenbaums will be appreciated.

REFERENCES

  1. Interviews with family members
  2. British Census Records for 1901, available online for free at Public Libraries and via subscription to Ancestry.com
  3. United States Federal Census Records for 1900, 1910, 1920, and 1930, available online (by subscription and at Public Libraries) at Ancestry.com and at Public Libraries through the Heritage Quest Census database.
  4. Ellis Island Passenger Lists, available at EllisIsland.org, at http://www.worldvitalrecords.com, and and on Ancestry.com's New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 (The Ancestry.com database is available by paid subscription or for free from public libraries).
  5. World War I Draft Registration Cards, available online at http://landing.ancestry.com/military/titles.aspx?html=ww1draft by subscription and for free from public libraries, and occasionally for free from Ancestry.Com's special offers
  6. California Birth Index 1905 to 1995, database at Ancestry.com available by subscription, and for free at public libraries and many other free sites listed on our Free United States Births page.
  7. California Death Index 1940 to 1997, at http://vitals.rootsweb.ancestry.com/ca/death/search.cgi?cj=1&o_xid=0000584
  8. Social Security Death Index, formerly available online for free at http://ssdi.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com, now available by paid subscription on Ancestry.com's Social Security Death Index or for free from subscribing public libraries.
  9. Records from Mt. View Cemetary, Home of Eternity, Oakland, California
  10. Records from Oakmont Memorial Park, Lafayette, California

 
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