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The Rest of the Story: The Ancestors of Sarah May Paddock Otstott
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Dr Thomas GERARD Esq (1608-1673)

      picture     picture     picture     picture
      Marker honoring Thomas Gerard at Colton's Point, Maryland. Photo by Dana Otstott Shear     Gerard Chapel is inside St Oswald's Church in Winwick. Thomas Gerard was baptised here.     Saint Clements Island historical marker which mentions Gerard. Photo by Dana Otstott Shear     Gerard Lane a few blocks from the shore on Colton's Point, Maryland. Photo by Dana Otstott Shear
 
      picture     picture     picture     picture
      Gerard marker with St Clement's Island in the background. Gerard landed on the island and owned it along with 20K acres in Maryland. Photo by Dana Otstott Shear     St Clement Island where Gerard landed. Photo by Dana Otstott Shear     Scale models of The Ark and The Dove. Thomas Gerard arrived in America on The Ark. Photo by Dana Otstott Shear 2010     Replica of The Dove docked at Historic Saint Mary's City, Maryland. Scale models of The Ark and The Dove. Thomas Gerard arrived in America on The Ark. The Dove was the cargo ship that accompanied The Ark to America. Photo by Dana Otstott Shear 2010
 
Name: Thomas GERARD 1,2,3
Sex: Male
Name Prefix: Dr
Name Suffix: Esq
Father: John GERARD (1584-1655)
Mother: Isabel OF WINWICK ( - )

Individual Events and Attributes

Birth 10 Dec 1608 Ashton in Makerfield, Lancashire, England 4
Baptism 10 Dec 1610 (age 2) Gerard Chapel of St Oswald Church, Winwick, England 4
Occupation churgeon (surgeon, physician); manufactured liquor, especially peach brandy, raised cattle 4
Emigration 1638 (age 29-30) from England 4
exiled Maryland
Title Lord of St Clement's, Basford and Westwood manors
Religion Roman Catholic
Marriage Count 2
Death 19 Oct 1673 (age 64) Westmoreland County, Virginia 4
Burial Longworth Point, St Clements, Maryland 4

Additional Information

Emigration on the Blessing. He brought the rest of the family in 1650
exiled as a result of his involvement in the Fendall Rebellion. He moved to Virginia, but retained his land holdings in Maryland.

Marriage

Spouse Susanna SNOW (1610-1666)
Children Temperance GERARD (1642-1712)
Marriage 21 Sep 1629 (age 20) Brookehouse, Straffordshire, England

Individual Note 1

Dr Thomas Gerard was one of the largest land owners in the colony of Maryland. He owned 11,400 acres including the property now known as Capitol Hill. (The Earliest Proprietors of Capitol Hill, by Margaret Brent Downing © 1918 Historical Society of Washington, D.C.)

He also owned the Heron Islands. He built a house on Colton's Point with views of the Potomac, St Clement's Bay and the Virginia shore. The home was destroyed by Richard Ingle during the Ingle Rebellion. (Ingle's Rebellion, sometimes known as "the Plundering Time," was one of the most violent events in Maryland's colonial history. It can only be understood in the context of the English Civil War. Cecilius Calvert, Second Lord Baltimore and his brother, Governor Leonard Calvert, put Maryland on the side of the king and against Parliament. In Maryland the conflict between Catholic Royalist and Puritan Roundhead invariably was translated into Catholic against Protestant.

 

Early in February 1645, Richard Ingle, captain of the ship Reformation, sailed into the colony intent on "rooting out the Papists." Finding a Dutch ship, the Looking Glass, anchored near St. Mary's City, Ingle at first hoisted a white flag, then suddenly fired a volley into the unsuspecting ship and sent men to capture her. Ingle raised a force of Protestant settlers and led them in plundering the estates of various Catholic leaders. John Lewgar and Giles Brent were captured, but Governor Calvert gathered a loyal force around him and held out in the newly built St. Thomas Fort. In response, the rebels built Mr. Pope's Fort around Governor Calvert's former residence. The next month, the rebels captured all five Jesuits in Maryland. Fathers Andrew White and Thomas Copley were sent back to England, along with Lewgar and Brent. The other three Jesuits died under uncertain circumstances. Richard Ingle left Maryland in April 1645, but the rebellion continued for two years. While Governor Calvert was in Virginia, St. Thomas Fort was taken and Lord Baltimore's government ceased to exist. Late in 1646, Calvert returned with a force of exiled Marylanders and Virginia volunteers, retook the colony, and ended this violent period.)

 

Gerard rebuilt only to have the house destroyed by the British during the Revolutionary War.

 

Daughter Anne Gerrard married Lt Col John Washington, great-grandfather of General George Washington, first President of the United States. When Anne died, John married her sister, Frances. Neither marriage produced children, however, he had issue from his first marriage to Anne Pope.

 

Dr Thomas Gerard survived Susannah Snow in 1666 St. Mary's Co, MD. Gerard died on 15 December 1673 Westmoreland Co, VA, at age 65. He was buried Longworth Point, St. Clements Manor, St. Mary's Co, MD; now known as Colton Point. The grave sites are said to have been lost through vandalism and later shore erosion.

 

Westmoreland County Record

 

William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol. 15, No. 3. (Jan., 1907, pp. 33-49.

 

WESTMORELAND COUNTY RECORDS.

 

The records in Northumberland, Westmoreland and Lancaster Counties are nearly complete, and are very valuable in showing the genesis of Virginia. The earliest settlement in the Northern Neck was at Chicacoan, which became a rallying point for all Protestants disaffected to the government of Lord Baltimore. Machodoc, Nominy and Appomattox were soon settled by other emigrants from Maryland. Then intermingled with these were emigrants direct from England and New England. For quite a number of years the settlements on the Potomac were cut off from Jamestown by miles of forest, broken at Mobjack Bay by a lonely post occupied by Peter Ransone and his

friends. In Quarterly IV., 28-43, 75-89, have already appeared some extracts from the records of Westmoreland County with comments upon the early people of the Northern Neck. The settlers were of the commercial class, and in this respect were truly representative of the English cities from which they came. In those days, sea-faring men were above the ordinary in general

 

Page 34.

 

. . . information, and many of them founded families of influence in America. Thus John Washington was mate of a ship and Andrew Monroe was a sea captain, and, both settling in Westmoreland County, established families which furnished each a President to the United States.

 

William Hardwich and Isaac Allerton were tailors; Joseph Hardwich was a serge-maker from Westbury in Somersetshire; Thomas Storke, a merchant of London; Thomas Surman, a cooper; John Hallowes and Francis Gray, carpenters. In England at this time, the trades were in high repute. The younger sons of the English gentry resorted to the cities and became tailors, grocers, coopers, weavers, etc. There could be no caste in England since the proudest noble found himself compelled to treat with respect the class into which his younger sons for a livelihood were forced to enter. These merchants, while not calling themselves "gentlemen", still clung to their coats-of-arms, which descended from their gentlemanly ancestors. The possession of land restored the old title of "gentleman", and land was easy to get in Virginia.

 

In addition to the persons named, founders of families of distinction

in Virginia, mention may be made of Nicholas Spencer, of Cople, in Bedfordshire; Richard Cole, who called his home on the Potomac "Salisbury Pary"; Dr. Thomas Gerard; Walter Broadhurst, of Shropshire; Valentine Peyton, of Middlesex County, England; John Lord, late of Hartford, Conn; Daniel Hutt, of London, Captain of the Mayflower; Thomas Speke, of Somersetshire; Samuel Hayward, of Longon; Gerard Fowke, of Staffordshire; Nathaniel Pope, of Briston; Henry Brett, of Plymouth; Henry Corbin, brother of Gawin Corbin, "citizen and leather-seller" of London; Richard Lee, of Stratford Langton, Essex, and many others. These men were merchants, representatives of old English families, and having each under

his control a squad of white servants, who were largely employed in

raising and shipping tobacco; and each had stores to furnish his dependents and neighbors with English goods. There were but few negroes in the early days, and property of this kind was probably not regarded with a favorable eye. Thus Richard Cole referred to John Washington as "an ass negro driver", which, perhaps, indicated that Washington, by way of exception depended on negro rather than white labor.

 

was born on 10 Dec 1608 in Lancashire, England. He died on 19 Oct 1673 in Mochoticks, Westmoreland, Co. Virginia. Dr. Thomas Gerard, Gentleman, was baptized in Winwick Prish, New Hall, Lancashire, England 10 Dec 1608. He was the son of John Gerard and Isabel ? of New Hall and the grandson of Thomas Gerard and Jane of Garswood. (Md Archives Liber XL11 folio 543).

 

The Gerard family was an ancient and prominent Roman Catholic family whose history has been traced back to the time of the General Survey of the Kingdom 1078.

 

Thomas Gerard married Susannah Snowe, daughter of John Snowe and Judith ? of Brookehouse, Staffordshire, England by 20 Jun 1634 (The Lancashire Record Office).

 

Thomas Gerard, surgeon, came into the Province of MD by April 1638 with five men servants (Md Land Office Patents Liber 1, folio 19). After several trips between Maryland and England, Thomas Gerard sold his holdings in England. On 19 Sep 1650 he demanded 2,000 acres of land for transporting himself, his wife and 5 chidren, a Mr Austin Hill, 8 men servants and 4 women servants in to the Province (Md Land office Patents L AB&H, f 47).

 

Thomas Gerard became one of the largest land owners in Maryland. on 3 Nov 1639, he was issued one of the first manorial grants to be issued in St Mary's Co. He acquired a patent for 1,030 acres he called "St Clement's Manor" (Md Land Office Patents Liber AB&H, Folio 68). This patent included St Clement's Island, the landing place of the first Maryland settlers in 1634. With this patent, he also achieved the status of "Lord of the Manor". On 24 Mar 1651, Thomas Gerard received a patent of 1,500 acres, he called "Bastford Manor" and a patent of 500 acres for I'St Winifred's Freehold" (Ibid. Folio 193-194). Thomas Gerard also acquired 3,500 acres of land called Gerard's Preserve" in Westmoreland County Virginia. He continued to acquire lands and at the time of his death his holdings contained about 16,000 acres.

 

Since Thomas Gerard's wife Susannah and their children were Protestant, he erected an Anglican Chapel for them on St Clement's Manor. According to Edwin Beitzell's writings the chapel was erected "at the head of a branch of St Patrick's Creek". It was the third Protestant church to be erected in Maryland.

 

Thomas Gerard, the surgeon, practiced medicine in Maryland and Virginia. He was also very active in the provincial politics of his day. He served as juryman at St Mary's in May 1638, elected a burgess to the assembly from St Mary's on 19 Feb 1639, commissioned by the Proprietor as "Conservator of the Peace" in March 1640 and elected burgess from St Clement's Hundred in Sep 1640. Thomas Gerard was appointed to the Provincial Council by a commission from Lord Baltimore, dated 17 Nov 1643. He held this position until he aligned himself with the Fendall Rebellion of 1660. With the collapse of the rebellion, Thomas Gerard was banished. He went to live in Westmoreland Co Virginia until he was pardoned by the Maryland council and was restored to citizenship in the Province but was forbidden to hold office (MD Archives Liber III, folio 406-407).

 

Susannah (Snowe) Gerard died in 1666 St Clement's Manor. Thomas moved to "Gerard's Preserve" in Westmoreland County Virginia. It was there that he married Mrs. Rose Tucker.

 

Thomas died in Virginia in 1673 and he was taken to Maryland and buried beside his first wife, Susannah Snowe. In his will he stated - "Testator desires to be buried by deceased wife Susanna". His will was dated 5 Feb 1672 and it was probated in St Mary's County 15 Dec 1673 (Md Cal of Wills L 1 f 567).

 

Dr. Thomas Gerard, Gentleman, was baptized in Winwick Parish, New Hall, Lancashire, England 10 Dec 1608. He was the son of John Gerard and Isabel ? of New Hall and the grandson of Thomas Gerard and Jane of Garswood. (Md Archives Liber XL11 folio 543).

 

The Gerard family was an ancient and prominent Roman Catholic family whose history has been traced back to the time of the General Survey of the Kingdom 1078.

 

Thomas Gerard married Susannah Snowe, daughter of John Snowe and Judith ? of Brookehouse, Staffordshire, England by 20 Jun 1634 (The Lancashire Record Office).

 

Thomas Gerard, surgeon, came into the Province of MD by April 1638 with five men servants (MD Land Office Patents Liber 1, folio 19). After several trips between Maryland and England, Thomas Gerard sold his holdings in England. On 19 Sep 1650 he demanded 2,000 acres of land for transporting himself, his wife and 5 chidren, a Mr Austin Hill, 8 men servants and 4 women servants in to the Province (Md Land office Patents L AB&H, f 47).

 

Thomas Gerard became one of the largest land owners in Maryland. on 3 Nov 1639, he was issued one of the first manorial grants to be issued in St Mary's Co. He acquired a patent for 1,030 acres he called "St Clement's Manor" (MD Land Office Patents Liber AB&H, Folio 68). This patent included St Clement's Island, the landing place of the first Maryland settlers in 1634. With this patent, he also achieved the status of "Lord of the Manor". On 24 Mar 1651, Thomas Gerard received a patent of 1,500 acres, he called "Bastford Manor" and a patent of 500 acres for I'St Winifred's Freehold" (Ibid. Folio 193-194). Thomas Gerard also acquired 3,500 acres of land called Gerard's Preserve" in Westmoreland County Virginia. He continued to acquire lands and at the time of his death his holdings contained about 16,000 acres.

 

Since Thomas Gerard's wife Susannah and their children were Protestant, he erected an Anglican Chapel for them on St Clement's Manor. According to Edwin Beitzell's writings the chapel was erected "at the head of a branch of St Patrick's Creek". It was the third Protestant church to be erected in Maryland.

 

Thomas Gerard, the surgeon, practiced medicine in Maryland and Virginia. He was also very active in the provincial politics of his day. He served as juryman at St Mary's in May 1638, elected a burgess to the assembly from St Mary's on 19 Feb 1639, commissioned by the Proprietor as "Conservator of the Peace" in March 1640 and elected burgess from St Clement's Hundred in Sep 1640. Thomas Gerard was appointed to the Provincial Council by a commission from Lord Baltimore, dated 17 Nov 1643. He held this position until he aligned himself with the Fendall Rebellion of 1660. With the collapse of the rebellion, Thomas Gerard was banished. He went to live in Westmoreland Co Virginia until he was pardoned by the Maryland council and was restored to citizenship in the Province but was forbidden to hold office (MD Archives Liber III, folio 406-407).

 

Susannah (Snowe) Gerard died in 1666 St Clement's Manor. Thomas moved to "Gerard's Preserve" in Westmoreland County Virginia. It was there that he married Mrs. Rose Tucker.

 

Thomas died in Virginia in 1673 and he was taken to Maryland and buried beside his first wife, Susannah Snowe. In his will he stated - "Testator desires to be buried by deceased wife Susanna". His will was dated 5 Feb 1672 and it was probated in St Mary's County 15 Dec 1673 (Md Cal of Wills L 1 f 567).

 

Thomas Gerard, emmigrated to St.Mary's County, Maryland. He and his family resided at St. Clements Manor. It was there that Thomas Gerard built a chapel. He apparently allowed interdenominational worship, [Susanna and the children were non-Catholic,Thomas was Catholic] however, the local Roman Catholic priest said that the arrangement was not allowed. He [the priest] apparently said he would come and live among them to see that the Catholic religion was practiced.

 

Susanna is buried at Longworth's Point, directly overlooking [in St.Clement's Manor] the cite where the Ark and the Dove first landed in Maryland. Thomas her widower, went to Virginia, married a "Rose"-----widow of John Tucker, and had issue. However, Thomas when near death, requested to be returned to Maryland and be buried next to his spouse, Susanna. Parents: John Gerard and Isabel.

He was married to Susanna Snowe on 21 Sep 1629 in Lancashire, England. Children were: Susannah Gerard, Frances Gerard, Temperance Gerard, Elizabeth Gerard, Gerard, Mary Gerard, Justinian Gerard, Thomas Gerard, John Gerard.5,6

Individual Note 2

Thomas Gerard was born on 10 Dec 1608 in Lancashire, England. He died on 19 Oct 1673 in Mochoticks, Westmoreland, Co. Virginia. Dr. Thomas Gerard, Gentleman, was baptized in Winwick Prish, New Hall, Lancashire, England 10 Dec 1608. He was the son of John Gerard and Isabel ? of New Hall and the grandson of Thomas Gerard and Jane of Garswood. (Md Archives Liber XL11 folio 543).

 

The Gerard family was an ancient and prominent Roman Catholic family whose history has been traced back to the time of the General Survey of the Kingdom 1078.

 

Thomas Gerard married Susannah Snowe, daughter of John Snowe and Judith ? of Brookehouse, Staffordshire, England by 20 Jun 1634 (The Lancashire Record Office).

 

Thomas Gerard, surgeon, came into the Province of MD by April 1638 with five men servants (Md Land Office Patents Liber 1, folio 19). After several trips between Maryland and England, Thomas Gerard sold his holdings in England. On 19 Sep 1650 he demanded 2,000 acres of land for transporting himself, his wife and 5 chidren, a Mr Austin Hill, 8 men servants and 4 women servants in to the Province (Md Land office Patents L AB&H, f 47).

 

Thomas Gerard became one of the largest land owners in Maryland. on 3 Nov 1639, he was issued one of the first manorial grants to be issued in St Mary's Co. He acquired a patent for 1,030 acres he called "St Clement's Manor" (Md Land Office Patents Liber AB&H, Folio 68). This patent included St Clement's Island, the landing place of the first Maryland settlers in 1634. With this patent, he also achieved the status of "Lord of the Manor". On 24 Mar 1651, Thomas Gerard received a patent of 1,500 acres, he called "Bastford Manor" and a patent of 500 acres for I'St Winifred's Freehold" (Ibid. Folio 193-194). Thomas Gerard also acquired 3,500 acres of land called Gerard's Preserve" in Westmoreland County Virginia. He continued to acquire lands and at the time of his death his holdings contained about 16,000 acres.

 

98

Since Thomas Gerard's wife Susannah and their children were Protestant, he erected an Anglican Chapel for them on St Clement's Manor. According to Edwin Beitzell's writings the chapel was erected "at the head of a branch of St Patrick's Creek". It was the third Protestant church to be erected in Maryland.

 

Thomas Gerard, the surgeon, practiced medicine in Maryland and Virginia. He was also very active in the provincial politics of his day. He served as juryman at St Mary's in May 1638, elected a burgess to the assembly from St Mary's on 19 Feb 1639, commissioned by the Proprietor as "Conservator of the Peace" in March 1640 and elected burgess from St Clement's Hundred in Sep 1640. Thomas Gerard was appointed to the Provincial Council by a commission from Lord Baltimore, dated 17 Nov 1643. He held this position until he aligned himself with the Fendall Rebellion of 1660. With the collapse of the rebellion, Thomas Gerard was banished. He went to live in Westmoreland Co Virginia until he was pardoned by the Maryland council and was restored to citizenship in the Province but was forbidden to hold office (Md Archives Liber III, folio 406-407).

 

Susannah (Snowe) Gerard died in 1666 St Clement's Manor. Thomas moved to "Gerard's Preserve" in Westmoreland County Virginia. It was there that he married Mrs. Rose Tucker.

 

Thomas died in Virginia in 1673 and he was taken to Maryland and buried beside his first wife, Susannah Snowe. In his will he stated - "Testator desires to be buried by deceased wife Susanna". His will was dated 5 Feb 1672 and it was probated in St Mary's County 15 Dec 1673 (Md Cal of Wills L 1 f 567).

Dr. Thomas Gerard, Gentleman, was baptized in Winwick Prish, New Hall, Lancashire, England 10 Dec 1608. He was the son of John Gerard and Isabel ? of New Hall and the grandson of Thomas Gerard and Jane of Garswood. (Md Archives Liber XL11 folio 543).

 

The Gerard family was an ancient and prominent Roman Catholic family whose history has been traced back to the time of the General Survey of the Kingdom 1078.

 

Thomas Gerard married Susannah Snowe, daughter of John Snowe and Judith ? of Brookehouse, Staffordshire, England by 20 Jun 1634 (The Lancashire Record Office).

 

Thomas Gerard, surgeon, came into the Province of MD by April 1638 with five men servants (Md Land Office Patents Liber 1, folio 19). After several trips between Maryland and England, Thomas Gerard sold his holdings in England. On 19 Sep 1650 he demanded 2,000 acres of land for transporting himself, his wife and 5 chidren, a Mr Austin Hill, 8 men servants and 4 women servants in to the Province (Md Land office Patents L AB&H, f 47).

 

Thomas Gerard became one of the largest land owners in Maryland. on 3 Nov 1639, he was issued one of the first manorial grants to be issued in St Mary's Co. He acquired a patent for 1,030 acres he called "St Clement's Manor" (Md Land Office Patents Liber AB&H, Folio 68). This patent included St Clement's Island, the landing place of the first Maryland settlers in 1634. With this patent, he also achieved the status of "Lord of the Manor". On 24 Mar 1651, Thomas Gerard received a patent of 1,500 acres, he called "Bastford Manor" and a patent of 500 acres for I'St Winifred's Freehold" (Ibid. Folio 193-194). Thomas Gerard also acquired 3,500 acres of land called Gerard's Preserve" in Westmoreland County Virginia. He continued to acquire lands and at the time of his death his holdings contained about 16,000 acres.

 

98

Since Thomas Gerard's wife Susannah and their children were Protestant, he erected an Anglican Chapel for them on St Clement's Manor. According to Edwin Beitzell's writings the chapel was erected "at the head of a branch of St Patrick's Creek". It was the third Protestant church to be erected in Maryland.

 

Thomas Gerard, the surgeon, practiced medicine in Maryland and Virginia. He was also very active in the provincial politics of his day. He served as juryman at St Mary's in May 1638, elected a burgess to the assembly from St Mary's on 19 Feb 1639, commissioned by the Proprietor as "Conservator of the Peace" in March 1640 and elected burgess from St Clement's Hundred in Sep 1640. Thomas Gerard was appointed to the Provincial Council by a commission from Lord Baltimore, dated 17 Nov 1643. He held this position until he aligned himself with the Fendall Rebellion of 1660. With the collapse of the rebellion, Thomas Gerard was banished. He went to live in Westmoreland Co Virginia until he was pardoned by the Maryland council and was restored to citizenship in the Province but was forbidden to hold office (Md Archives Liber III, folio 406-407).

 

Susannah (Snowe) Gerard died in 1666 St Clement's Manor. Thomas moved to "Gerard's Preserve" in Westmoreland County Virginia. It was there that he married Mrs. Rose Tucker.

 

Thomas died in Virginia in 1673 and he was taken to Maryland and buried beside his first wife, Susannah Snowe. In his will he stated - "Testator desires to be buried by deceased wife Susanna". His will was dated 5 Feb 1672 and it was probated in St Mary's County 15 Dec 1673 (Md Cal of Wills L 1 f 567).

Thomas Gerard,emmigrated to St.Mary's County,Maryland. He and his family resided at St. Clements Manor. It was there that Thomas Gerard built a chapel. He apparently allowed interdenominational worship, [Susanna and the children were non Catholic,Thomas was Catholic] however ,the localRoman Catholic priest said that the arrangement was not allowed.He [the priest] apparently said he would come and live among them to see that the Catholic religion was practiced.

 

Susanna is buried at Longworth's Point,directly overlooking [in St.Clement's Manor] the cite where the Ark and the Dove first landed in Maryland..Thomas her widower, went to Virginia,married a "Rose"-----widow of John Tucker,and had issue. However,Thomas when near death,requested to be returned to Maryland and be buried next to his spouse,Susanna Parents: John Gerard and Isabel.

He was married to Susanna Snowe on 21 Sep 1629 in Lancashire, England. Children were: Susannah Gerard, Frances Gerard, Temperance Gerard, Elizabeth Gerard, Gerard, Mary Gerard, Justinian Gerard, Thomas Gerard, John Gerard.7

Individual Note 3

Maryland Family Group Sheet for Dr. Thomas GERRARD Family; St. Mary’s Co., MD

 

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Copyright © by the submitter All rights reserved. http://www.fgs-project.com/copyright.html

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Submitted by: Karen BENNETT

Email address: CeeCee82@aol.com

 

 

Husband: Dr. Thomas GERRARD

Birthdate: December 10, 1608

Birthplace: Newhall, Ashton-in-Makerfield, Lancashire, England Death date: 1673

Place of death: Machadoc, Westmoreland County, Virginia

Father: John GERRARD

Mother: Isabel unknown

 

Marriage date: September 21, 1629

Marriage place: England

 

Wife: Susanna SNOWE

Birthdate: ca 1610

Birthplace: Staffordshire, England

Death date: 1666

Place of death: Longworth Point, St. Mary's County, Maryland

Father: John SNOWE

Mother: Edyreth unknown

 

CHILDREN

 

Child No. 1: Susanna GERRARD

Sex: F

Birthdate: before 1637

Birthplace: Lancashire, England

Death date: ca. 1681

Place of death: St. Mary's County, Maryland

Marriage date: January 26, 1653/4

Marriage place: St. Clements Manor, St. Mary's County, Maryland

Spouse's name: Robert SLYE #1

 

Child No. 2: Justinian GERRARD

Sex: M

Birthdate: unknown

Birthplace:

Death date: 1688

Place of death: St. Mary's County, Maryland

Marriage date:

Marriage place:

Spouse's name: Sarah MAUNDERS

 

Child No. 3: Frances GERRARD

Sex: F

Birthdate: before 1637

Birthplace: Lancashire, England

Death date: About 1696

Place of death: Westmoreland County, Virginia

Marriage date: unknown

Marriage place:

Spouse's name: Col. Valentine PEYTON # 1

 

Child No. 4: Temperance GERRARD

Sex: F

Birthdate: Before 1637

Birthplace: Lancashire, England

Death date: 1712

Place of death: Westmoreland County, Virginia

Marriage date: June 1, 1669

Marriage place: St. Mary's County, Maryland

Spouse's name: Daniel HUTT #1

 

Child No. 5: John GERRARD

Sex:

Birthdate: unknown

Birthplace:

Death date: Before 1678

Place of death: St. Mary's County, Maryland

Marriage date: unknown

Marriage place:

Spouse's name: Elizabeth unknown

 

================================================================================

 

Documentation: Will of Thomas Gerrard; Will of Robert Slye; Will of Daniel Hutt;

"History of Cople Parish, 1664-1964" by Bertha Lawrence Newton Davison,

published 1999; Will of John Crabbe; "Tidewater Maryland" by Paul Wilstach 1945

- DAR; Side-Lights of Maryland History; Ancestral Roots of Certain American

Colonists, 7th edition; British Roots of Maryland Families; "Thomas Gerrard of

Maryland, Virginia" by Lindsay M. Brien, 1955; Maryland Magazine of History,

Vol. 8, p 262, 268; William & Mary Quarterly, 1st Ser. Vol. 5, p 36-7; Hayden's

Virginia Genealogies, p 490; Maryland Magazine of History, Vol. 9, p 111 "The

Eastern Shore of Maryland and Virginia" Charles B. Clark - Vol. 11; Papers of

Capt. Ross F. Collins at St. Mary's County Historical Society, Maryland.8

Individual Note 4

Thomas Gerard was baptised at the Gerard Chapel at St Oswald's Church in Winwick. The chapel still remains with some damage as a result of the Reformation.

 

A Brief History of the Church at Winwick

 

Ancient History

 

There is a tradition that the church occupies the site of an ancient Druidical altar and pre-Christian temple. This is supported by the report of excavations beneath the Chancel in 1828, when 3 gigantic skeletons were said to have been discovered. Certainly Winwick is an ancient site – Usher claimed that the name was a corruption of Caer Gwentquic, an ancient British name, but this is only one opinion.

 

St. Oswald

 

The earliest Christian associations are with St. Oswald, King of Northumbria from 634 – 642 AD. He was killed in battle fighting the heathen King Penda, of Mercia, in the Battle of ‘Maserfelth’. The district around Winwick is known as ‘Makerfield’ and it is thought that Oswald died near the site of the church – although it is only fair to say that many scholars support the claims of Oswestry. It is significant that there is a well, known as “St. Oswald’s well” a mile away from the church.

 

St. Oswald converted his kingdom to Christianity, with the help of St. Aiden from Iona.

 

Previous Churches on the Site

 

On a window-cill in the Gerard Chapel – the NE chapel in the church – can be seen the cross arm of a Saxon preaching Cross, dating from around 750AD, which stood until probably broken down by Cromwell’s soldiers during the Civil War. Only the back is on view as the front was defaced in 1721 and used as a grave stone. On each end is a carving – one said to illustrate the martyrdom of Oswald, the other to show a priest carrying water from St. Oswald’s well. Wood –cuts of these carvings are adjacent to the Cross for ease of viewing. In the same chapel is a damaged Saxon font, also probably damaged by the Puritans.

At the base of the pillars on the North side of the church can be seen carved stone heads. These bases represent an earlier stone church on the site. The carvings may be Bishops wearing mitres, being fragments of an earlier Norman church – Winwick Church is mentioned in the Doomsday Book – but it has also been said that they are Saxon carvings of St Oswald and St Antony of Egypt.

 

The Winwick Pig

 

This famous carving is on the exterior of the West wall of the tower.

There is a legend that a pig moved the stones for the building of the church to its present place on the hill, all the time crying “Win – ick”!

 

The truth is probably more prosaic. The carving stands adjacent to a niche in the wall, which probably contained a statue of St. Antony of Egypt, whose symbol was a pig. St. Antony, a founder of monasticism, was of considerable significance for the Iona community. The statues were destroyed by Cromwell but were replaced in 1973 with new figures – St Oswald on the left, and St Antony on the right.

 

The Present Church

 

The present building is said to date from 1358, although the Legh chapel is older. The oldest part of the church proper is the Bell Tower, which contains a peal of 6 bells dated 1711 in addition to the old Sanctus Bell. The clock was installed in 1876.

Over the centuries much of the church has been rebuilt or restored. The oldest pillars are on the North side of the church, the ones on the South side having been rebuilt in 1836.

In 1701 the present Nave roof was added. The sloping line of the previous pitched roof can still be seen on either side of the clock face on the West wall. The names of the then Churchwardens are carved on the beams.

 

The South porch was added in 1720. At one time this was the main entrance to the church and is still often referred to as the ‘wedding door.’

 

On the South wall there is a fine monument to Thomas Bretherton who ‘served his country with great fidelity in three successive Parliaments in the reign of King William the Third.’ Above the South porch are five now faded tablets recording the charitable bequests to the parish.

The Nave pews, the Pulpit and the Lectern date from the internal restoration of 1858. The choir stalls were installed in the 1920s.

 

The organ was bought from Powys Castle around 1850. Recently the worn out instrument has been preserved but the sound now is of a 3- manual Makin organ, installed in the original case.

 

Hanging in the Nave is a picture of the Broad Oak Dinner, given in honour of Captain (later Admiral) Phipps Hornby, the son of the Rector, who won a naval victory in the Battle of Lisa, 1811. The captured French Flag can be seen in a display case near the North door. The Broad Oak blew down in the great storm of 1850; its timber was used to produce the benches, which are at present in the Gerard chapel.

 

The timber screen between the Nave and the Tower was erected in 1920 as a First World War memorial.

 

Stained Glass

 

The window at the West end of the South aisle was installed as a memorial to Rector F.G. Hopwood in 1890. The West window of the Tower commemorates Rector J.J. Hornby, who died in 1855.

 

All the stained glass in the Chancel was given in 1849 by Edward, 13th Earl of Derby, in memory of his family’s service as Patrons of the Parish since 1433. The obituary window, above the memorial table has the family Coat of Arms and six small shields. The East window shows the writers of the New Testament; the other windows illustrate various Bible Stories.

In the Gerard chapel, the East window depicting scenes from the life of St. Oswald was installed in 1938 as a memorial to the Stone family.

 

The Pugin Chancel

 

Cromwell had stationed his troops in the Church after the Battle of Red Bank 1648. Much damage was done to the church; from then onwards the mediaeval chancel decayed. It was reconstructed in 1849 by the famous architect A.W. Pugin who designed every detail – modelling it on the old chancel – from floor tiles to ceiling, and from stained glass to vestry cupboards. In 1970 the chancel was restored to Pugin’s original design and is one of the glories of the church.

 

In the Chancel can be seen memorials to more recent Rectors, and one dated 1689 to Rector Richard Sherlock who insisted on writing his own epitaph “tread under foot this worthless salt” – but his parishioners added “ his life and merits exceed all praise”.

 

The Gerard Chapel

 

On the floor of this chapel – the East end of the North aisle – is a magnificent, but damaged brass memorial to Sir Piers Gerard who died in 1495. Beneath the floor is the family vault. This has not been used since the Reformation.

At the East end is a Communion Table dated 1725. This was the main Altar of the Church until the restoration of the Chancel. The Churchwardens Accounts record its purchase for £4.00. In the centre is an anagram of the initials of the Rector of the day – Rev. Dr. Francis Annesley, and in the corners are inlaid the initials of the Churchwardens. On the North wall is an aumbry containing the Reserved Sacrament.

 

The Legh Chapel

 

This chapel, the chantry chapel of the Legh family of Lyme Hall, contains several very fine marble monuments. It also contains an unusual brass – to Sir Peter Legh and his wife, dated 1527. Sir Peter is depicted wearing priests vestments over his armour – he was ordained after the death of his young wife. The fine Tudor roof with gilded carved angels. This chapel now houses the organ.

 

Famous Rectors

 

The first recorded Rector was Hugh de Wynewhick in 1192.

Four Rectors have been Archdeacons, six have been Bishops. Two, the Revs. Sherlock and Herle became nationally known for their writings – their portraits hang in the Gerard Chapel.

The Hornby family were great benefactors of the village, founding charity schools, alms houses and restoring the church. Rev. J.J. Hornby was responsible for dividing the ancient parish into the 15 modern parishes which now occupy the area. Before this division, the living of Winwick was one of the best in the land, indeed in the reign of Henry VIII it was said to be the best at £100 per annum.

 

We do hope that you are able to visit our church. Remember the presence of our Lord and do not leave without saying a prayer for yourself and for those who worship here.

 

Sources: ‘Discovering Winwick Church’ Philip Andrews; ‘History of Winwick’ Beamont9

Individual Note 5

St. Clement's Island lies in the Potomac River near Colton's Point, Maryland, in the United States. The uninhabited island has been designated St. Clement's Island State Park.

 

The park preserves the site of the March 25, 1634, landing of Maryland's first colonists, commemorated as Maryland Day. The island served as a convenient and non-threatening temporary base of operations for the 150 settlers, as they negotiated with the Yaocomico Indians for land for a permanent settlement. It was the site of the first mass celebrated in that part of the world, said by Jesuit Father Andrew White. It is widely believed that mass took place on the very day of the landing itself.[2] St. Clement's Manor, including the Island, was the first manor granted by Lord Baltimore and its lord, Dr. Thomas Gerard (Gerrard), who played a significant role in 17th century Maryland history. They named the island in honor of Pope Saint Clement I, patron of mariners. The island, soon renamed Blackistone Island after the Blackistone family, came under its ownership in 1669 and remained in that family for 162 years. It was renamed St. Clement's Island once again in 1961, when the property was leased to the state of Maryland.

 

A water ferry leaves from the St. Clement's Island-Potomac River Museum near Colton's Point. A 40- foot stone cross stands on the island, in memory of the first settlers. In 1934, to celebrate Maryland’s 300th birthday, Governor Albert Ritchie, dedicated the cross recognizing this site as the location where religious toleration in America had its foundation.[3] The park is administered by Point Lookout State Park. The St. Clement's Island Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on April 10, 1972.[1]

 

For many years the island, then known as Blackistone Island, was the site of a lighthouse. Through the efforts of the St. Clement's Hundred, a local community organization created for the preservation of St. Clement's Island, a replica of the Blackistone Lighthouse was constructed and completed in June 2008.[3]

 

NOTES:

1 a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2008-04-15. http://nrhp.focus.nps.gov/natreg/docs/All_Data.html.

2 "St. Clement's Island Historic District". National Register of Historic Places listings. Maryland Historical Trust. 2008-04-15. http://www.mht.maryland.gov/nr/NRDetail.aspx?HDID=84&COUNTY=Saint%20Marys&FROM=NRCountyList.aspx?COUNTY=Saint%20Marys.

3 a b "St. Clement's Island". Recreation And Parks Museum Division listings. St Mary's County. 2009-09-05. http://www.co.saint-marys.md.us/recreate/museums/stclementsisland.asp.

 

SOURCES:

St. Clement's Island State Park - official site

St. Clement's Island Historic District, St. Mary's County, Inventory No.: SM-123, including photo in 2002, at Maryland Historical Trust website10

Sources

1Weis, Frederick Lewis & Sheppard, Walter Lee, Jr, "Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: Lineages from Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and other Historical Individuals". p 209, 233A-43.
2John Walton, "Genealogica Marylandia: Gerard's Daughters" (Maryland Historical Magazine. Vp; 68, No. 4, Winter 1973, pg 443-450).
3Edwin W Beitzell, "Thomas Gerard and his Sons-in-Law" (Maryland Genealogies from Maryland Historical Magazine, Vol 46, 1951).
4Weis, Frederick Lewis & Sheppard, Walter Lee, Jr, "Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700: Lineages from Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and other Historical Individuals". p 209, 233A - 43.
5"Maryland Online Encyclopedia" (mdoe.org). http://www.mdoe.org/inglesrebellion.html.
6Margaret Brent Downing, "The Earliest Proprietors of Capitol Hill" (1/16/1917).
7Edna Franklin, "Edna Franklin. GEDCOM" (http://e.franklin.home.mchsi.com/alexharr/fowsrc.htm#1).
8"Maryland Family Group Sheet for Thomas Gerrard" (http://www.fgs-project.com/maryland/g/gerrard-t.txt).
9"St Oswald" (http://www.stoswaldwinwick.com/page_11). http://www.stoswaldwinwick.com/page_11.
10"Wikipedia". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Clement%27s_Island_State_Park.