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THE LIFE OF FREDERICK LEHMANN



And Some of his Ancestors and Descendants



By Louis Lehmann



PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS



In 1990 I prepared a little booklet about "The Legend of Frederick Lehmann - Primarily an Account of his Brief Military Career in the Seventh Minnesota Infantry Regiment during the 1862 Sioux Uprisings in Minnesota" for the 1990 Lehmann reunion in Spokane, Washington, organized by cousins Lana Scheres and Gerry Harstad (now deceased). I expressed gratitude to them and to the following cousins who, up until that time, shared much valuable information including the well-known tale which I have labeled as the "The Family Legend": Steven Lehmann (now deceased) and his daughters, Jerrelyn and Suzanne; Sarah (Lehmann) Fossen and Fern Lehmann, both now deceased. I had this unpublished booklet printed and distributed it only among my relatives. But some time after that 1990 reunion I inadvertently left a copy of it on a table at the Minnesota Historical Society when I was doing further research. I have since discovered that it has somehow been included in the Society's collections and can be accessed through their catalogue. (1)



Since that first Lehmann reunion in 1990, most of the important work about the Lehmann and Roller families has been done by my cousin, Lois (Lehmann) Carlson. Through many years of diligent research, Lois compiled a vast amount of significant information about these lines. The quality and quantity of her contributions have been enormous. I am very deeply indebted to her. She has done far more than I or anyone else has done in gathering information about our mutual ancestral relatives.

In 1992, Lois and I jointly prepared a paper "Ancestry and Descendants of Frederick Lehmann and Mary Roller." Lois actually did most of the work. Portions of that paper were then incorporated into another unpublished booklet with the same name. This was distributed among cousins at a second Lehmann reunion in 1992 at St. Paul, Minnesota. (2)



Two years later I compiled another unpublished booklet, "The Descendants of Frederick Lehmann 1830-1903" which was distributed to cousins at the 1994 Lehmann reunion at Elk River, Minnesota. This booklet contains many omissions and errors, including one within the title as it has since been learned that Frederick Lehmann was born in 1832, not 1830. (3) Now, nineteen years later after that first booklet, I am preparing this revised historical story which will eventually be linked to my RootsWeb website at http://freepages.family.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~genealogyaddict/

I dedicate this story to my deceased parents, Bryce and Elizabeth Lehmann, to my children Debra Vanasse and Christopher Lehmann, and to my grandchildren, Lynx and Jessica Vanasse.



DEBUNKING THE FAMILY LEGEND



I'm not sure who wrote the initial legend of Frederick Lehmann but it seems to have circulated among various branches of the family for some time. The first (undocumented) versions came to me periodically from Jerrylen Samuelson, Suzanne Lentz, Sarah Fossen, and Fern Lehmann. The legend is as follows:



"The Baumburgers were wine merchants in Bern, Switzerland. Frederick John Baumburger was a very large man, seven feet two inches tall. His wife was five feet tall. Frederick John Baumburger had three sons and one daughter. The oldest son, Louis, seven feet and seven inches tall, never married and was a bodyguard to Napoleon at the time of the Russian invasion. The second son, Frederick came to America, settled in Burlington, Iowa. He became a furniture dealer and cabinet maker. He never married and died in 1850. There is no record of the daughter . . . The youngest son, John, small in stature like his mother, was born January 1, 1830 in Bern, Switzerland. In 1848, rather than attend military school, he ran away from home and sailed via a sailboat from Rotterdam to Norway, England and then to America. It took him three months. When he landed in New York, he had no funds. On board the ship he met a farmer by the name of Lehmann who gave him work. After a year and a half on the farm in New York state, he ran away again and tried to find his brother, Frederick, in Burlington, Iowa. As he was not of legal age, the Swiss authorities had traced him to New York and were trying to have him returned to his home in Switzerland . . . On his arrival in Burlington, Iowa, he found that his brother had died a few weeks before. His family attorney was to arrive to settle his brother's estate shortly, so he went on to St. Anthony Falls, Minnesota. Here he changed his name, taking his brother's name of Frederick and worked as a carpenter in and around St. Anthony Falls and built some of the first houses in St. Paul . . . At the outbreak of the Civil War, he took out his first citizenship papers, taking the name of his brother, Frederick and the surname of the farmer who had helped him on his arrival in America, the name of Lehmann. He enlisted in the Seventh Minnesota Regiment, fought the Sioux Indians in the battle of New Ulm (Minnesota) and was wounded at the time of the "Hanging of the Indians at New Ulm." He was taken by ox-cart to Fort Ripley, army truck to St. Paul. At the hospital in St. Paul, he was nursed by Mary Margaret Rohler whom he married in 1863, October fifth . . . The Rohlers were of German heritage, living in Wittenburg on the Elbe River in Brandenburg Province. The family moved to Berlin and about 1860 came to America and settled in Tell City, Indiana. The parents did not live long after coming to America. In 1862 the six daughters and one son moved to Nutria" (New Trier?) "near St. Paul. The daughters nursed in the hospital in St. Paul during the Civil War . . . Mary Margaret Rohler was born January 20, 1841 in Wittenburg, Germany. She married Frederick Lehmann October 5, 1863. They settled in Hastings, Minnesota. For twelve years Frederick Lehmann ran a woodworking shop there and was considered ' well-to-do.' There were seven sons and one daughter: John, Frank, Frederick, Bertha, George, Albert, Otto, and Ernest . . . When Minnesota was opened for the Civil War veterans, the family opened a claim in Oak Valley townships, Ottertail County, Minnesota. They retired to Wadena about 1895."



Like many family legends, the above tale is a mixture of factual and erroneous information. I have found no records to support the assertion that Frederick Lehmann's father was a wine merchant (However U.S. tax records for 1864-65 indicate that his cousin, Jacob Baumberger, was a wine merchant in Burlington, Iowa.) (4) Nor have I found any information to confirm the height of his parents. But Switzerland civic records do show that the name of Frederick's father was Johann Jacob Baumberger (not "Frederick John Baumberger) who married Anna Leeman 18 Sept 1829. Their children were all born at Koppigen, Bern, Switzerland: Jacob Baumberger was born 6 May 1830 (Koppigen civil records note that he emigrated to the U.S.A in 1851 but he has not been mentioned in any other available records.) Johann Baumberger (the birth name of Frederick Lehmann) was born 2 Jan 1832 (not 1 Jan 1830.) Vincens Baumberger was born 3 Sept 1834 and died 20 Feb 1840. Verena Baumberger was born 13 Dec 1836 and died 18 April 1837. Albrecht Baumberger was christened 25 Feb 1838 and died 21 Mar 1838. (5) (6) There are no records of any sons named Louis or Frederick. (However two of Frederick Lehmann's cousins living in Burlington, Iowa, were named Louis and Frederick.) And because the parents were married in 1829, it is impossible that any son of Johann Jacob Baumberger and Anna Leeman could have been a bodyguard to Napoleon at the time of the Russian invasion since that occurred in 1812.



Apart from his 1830 birth record, no other information has surfaced about Johann Baumberger's (aka Frederic Lehmann) brother, Jacob Baumberger. It is possible that the family legend confused Johann's brother, Jacob, with Johann's cousin, Jacob Baumberger, born 19 Nov 1825 at Koppigen to Jacob and Elizabeth Pulver who emigrated to the U.S., settling first in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, and next in Burlington, Iowa. (7). Perhaps it is this cousin whom Johann was seeking in Burlington as no other Baumberger family appears there in the 1850 census. (8)



The legend's claim that Johann came to America "via a sailboat" probably means that the ship on which he was traveling had sails. Actually he arrived in New York aboard the H. Miller from Le Havre on April 20, 1855. The passenger list noted that he was carrying "one bag," listed him as a farmer and his country of origin as Switzerland Next to him on the passenger list is Fred Leiber, also listed as farmer with Switzerland as country of origin. (Family legend said that Johann Baumberger took the name Fred Lehmann from a farmer he met on the boat) (9) No conclusive records have emerged to support the legend's statement that he lived and worked around St. Anthony Falls but there is a listing on the 1857 Minnesota state census, Hennepin County, St. Anthony, for a person named "Frederick" (no last name listed), age 22, born in Switzerland, as one of ten people living in dwelling #575 (a boarding house?), headed by a "Sill Cook." There appears to be ditto marks on Frederick's line just underneath the occupation listing of "Butcher" for the name above (H.H. Braseskit). (10) The name "Frederick Lehmann" does not appear in the 1860 census for Hastings, Minnesota. But there is a listing for a "Fred Leonard" age 25, born in Switzerland, living in a household with Jacob and Mary Kohler who are listed as witnesses on the certificate of marriage for Frederick Lehmann and Mary Roller on 5 Oct 1863. (11) (12)



Contrary to the family legend, Frederick Lehmann's civil war records do not show any service at the battle of New Ulm. And the most glaring error in the family legend is the statement that Frederick was "wounded at the time of the 'Hanging of the Indians at New Ulm'. There is no record that he was ever wounded and as all histories will testify, the 'hanging of the Indians" was at Mankato, not New Ulm. Frederic's civil war records show that he was indeed in Company F of the Seventh Minnesota Regiment, he was in the Battle of Wood Lake, and he was discharged with a disability stemming from doing guard duty without an overcoat. (13)



Mary Margaret Roller was born 20 Jan 1841 in Kleinbettlingen. (14)







CONNECTING FREDERICK LEHMANN WITH THE BAUMBERGERS



Some years ago Lois (Lehmann) Carlson visited a distant Baumberger cousin in Burlington, Iowa and obtained a copy of a letter, written in German. Lois arranged for the following translation which establishes a connection between Johann Baumberger (aka Frederic Lehmann) and Baumbergers in Switzerland:.



"Burgdorf, Switzerland, 11 April 1893.



Herr Theod. Guelich, Lawyer & Notary, 422 North Main St, Burlington, (Iowa), North America.



.Honored Sir:, Your letter of 30 Nov 1892, along with the proxy of siblings Louis, Henry, Jacob and Rosa Baumberger, all of Burlington was received. Certainly this proxy, and be received for the listed siblings Baumberger, as legitimate heirs of their parents, based on the portion of the estate of the deceased widow, Anna Weber born Baumberger who died on 29 May 1872 in Koppigen; namely:...(1) Anna Maria Sollberger, born Baumberger, or her husband Johann Sollberger Maurer" (a stone mason or brick layer) " early in Remserin now living in Madretsch near Vidau 1/3 gift - francs 165 . . . (2) of the children of Johann Ulrich Baumberger, deceased, namely: (a) Samuel Judermuhle, as husband of Louise, born Baumberger zu c 1/4 - francs 41.25 (b) of the forementioned proxy of the other three siblings, Ferdinand, Johann Gottlieb and Anna Maria Baumberger, 3/4 of a franc 41.25 123.75 francs 165, all plus interest . . . The last of Johannes Baumberger (Frederick Lehmann) in Wadena, owed a third for 165 francs is to be collected directly from your client in America . . . I have done the following and have sent the following amounts: (1) of Samuel Judermuhle - Baumberger in Chause de fonds 41.25 francs and interest 10s = 51.35 . . . (2) of the forementioned administration of siblings Ferdinand, Johann Gottlieb and Anna Maria Baumberger 123.75 francs plus interest 30.25 = 154, total 205.35 francs . . . The mail to Johann Sollbereger-Baumberger in Madretsch totaling 165 francs plus interest, unfortunately was not delivered. Further about Sollberger; a long and costly search with uncertain results would occur and it appears the ending would be fruitless. Sollberger is an old man, unable to do any work and he depends on his son and daughter for his livelihood. Saying this, I would see only a problem for you in completing this settlement. In conformity, my outstanding account comes in total to 205.35 francs. The total cost of Mr. Furfprechter Reichenback for investigative report, etc. is 24 francs. My own charge and expenses for correspondence costs, investigation, follow-up, settlement, delivery, etc. is 71.34 francs. There remains in your client's account a credit of which I have sent to you by post today. I deposited the actual brief concerning the management of Sollberger, namely the writ of execution from 21 February 1893 and the damaged (forfeiture) certificate from 3 March 1893. I will send you a receipt and I will bring this business to a close . . .

With most hearty greetings, Gugen Grefburts"



A number of IGI Koppigen events, submitted by patrons (all events needing verification) suggest that the deceased widow was Anna (Baumberger) Weber (chr 8 Dec 1793, m Johannes Weber 6 Oct 1820); a sister of (1) Anna Maria (Baumberger) Sollberger (chr 31 Aug 1814; (2) Johann Ulrich Baumberger, chr 12 Mar 1812; and (3) Johann Jacob Baumberger, chr 23 July 1810, m Anna Leeman 18 Sept 1829. The parents of all these siblings are Johann Hans and Susanna (Stebler) Baumberger. Johann Jacob and Anna (Leeman) Baumberger are the parents of Johann Baumberger (aka Frederick Lehmann), a nephew of Anna (Baumberger) Weber. (15)





THE BAUMBERGERS AND LEEMANS IN SWITZERLAND





THE BAUMBERGERS OF KOPPIGEN



Johann Baumberger (aka Frederick Lehmann) was born 2 Jan 1832 at Koppigen (a village about 18 miles from the city of Bern in Switzerland) to Johann Jacob and Anna (Leeman) Baumberger. As noted earlier, his three younger siblings; Vincens, Verena, and Albrecht; all died young. (16) His older brother, Jacob (b 7 Mar 1830) reportedly emigrated to the U.S. in 1851 but no conclusive records of him have yet emerged in the (17)U.S.. (18) (19) Two major events occurred in Switzerland before Johann and Jacob emigrated; (1) Switzerland's civil war (the "Sonderbundskrieg") in 1845 stemmed from antagonisms between Catholics and Protestants, and (2) The subsequent establishment of a new constitution in 1848 combined elements of the U..S. constitution and French revolutionary tradition. (20)

Johann Jacob Baumberger was born 23 July 1810 at Koppigen to Johann Hans and Susanna (Stebler) Baumberger. He married Anna Leeman 18 Sept 1829 at Koppigen. At about the time of their marriage the international Vienna congress (on Napoleon's orders) confirmed Switzerland's borders and established its perpetual neutrality for which it is justly famous. Subsequently Switzerland experienced eighteen years of bitter conflict between liberals and conservatives. (21) (22) (23)



Johann Hans Baumberger was born 24 Sept 1771 at Koppigen to Niklaus and Barbara (Knuchel) Baumberger. He married Susanna Stebler 24 Feb 1794 at Koppigen. The years surrounding their marriage were some of the most eventful ones in Switzerland's history. Between 1791 and 1797 there were small revolutions throughout Switzerland as peasants sought liberty and equality, sometimes encouraging intervention by the French. (Yet in 1792 many Swiss families mourned the death of sons who were mercenaries trying to defend the King against radicals in the French Revolution.) In 1798 French troops, supporting revolutionaries in western Switzerland occupied and looted the city of Bern, just fifteen miles from Koppigen. Farmers in occupied areas became free citizens. The Helvetic Republic was proclaimed 12 April 1798 but soon experienced a number of coups. ,Napoleon withdrew French troops from Switzerland in 1802, leading to more unrest in a civil war in which peasants armed with sticks and farm tools attacked Helvetic troops. It is known as the "Stecklikrieg" (the war of the sticks) and led eventually to the restoration of the political institutions of the cantons as Napoleon intervened, gave orders to put an end to the civil war, and enforced a new constitution negotiated under his "mediation" (24) (25) (26) (27)



Niklaus Baumberger was born 1 October 1747 at Koppigen to Bendicht and Verena (Widmer) Baumberger. He married Barbara Knuchel 16 April 1769 at Koppigen. Like most of the Swiss people, Niklaus and his ancestors had no political rights and there was no such thing as free commerce and freedom of the press in Switzerland. During their lifetimes there were a number of unsuccessful little revolutions in Switzerland. (28)



Bendicht Baumberger, chr 9 Oct 1712 at Koppigen, married Verena Widmer 28 Sept 1736. His parents are Durs and Anna (Schneider) Baumberger.



Durs Baumberger, chr 28 Sept 1686 at Koppigen, married Anna Schneider 18 May 1710 at Koppigen. His parents are Hans and Barbara Baumberger. Hans married Barbara ____ 19 Feb 1679.



The parents of Hans are Michel and Verena Baumberger who both died 12 Feb 1672. (29) (30). I have not found records of their births or their marriage but they probably lived at the time of 1653 Peasants' War which was a . . . "revolt of the rural population between Lucerne and Bern against the undemocratic rule of the cities. The rebels are defeated and severely punished" (31)



THE LEEMANS OF UTZENSTORF



I have found very little contextual or historical information specifically about the Leemans of Utzenstorf which is a little village just three miles from Koppigen Of course they were all influenced by the historical events noted above in the discussion about the Baumbergers of Koppigen



Anna Leeman was born 27 Aug 1809 at Utzenstorf to Samuel and Maria (Christen) Leeman who were married 16 Sept 1803 at Utzenstorf; also living in Utzenstorf in 1809 was a 13-year-old boy named Jacob Steiner who had not yet learned to write. Nevertheless he was destined to become one of the world's greatest mathematicians and certainly the most famous person to come out of Anna's hometown. (32) Anna married Johann Jacob Baumberger at Koppigen 18 Sept 1829. (33) (34) (35)



Samuel Leeman was christened 6 Oct 1771 at Utzenstorf. His parents, Hans and Elsbeth (Adam) Leeman, were married at Utzenstorf on 9 May 1765. Hans was christened 27 Nov 1746 at Utzenstorf; parents Abraham and Barbara (Minder) Leeman. Abraham married Barbara Minder at Utzenstorf 9 Sept 1746.



Abraham Leeman was christened 26 Sept 1723 at Utzenstorf. His parents were Bendicht and Verena (Gygli) Leeman who were married at Utzenstorf on 4 April 1721. Bendicht was christened 13 Jan 1684 at Utzenstorf. His parents, Urs and Anna (Herischwand) Leeman, were married at Utzenstorf on 24 Jan 1673. Urs was christened 20 Feb 1648 at Utzenstorf. His parents, Cunradt and Maria (Lang) Leeman, were married at Utzenstorf on 29 Feb 1644. Cunradt was christened 15 Sept 1617 at Utzenstorf. His parents were Hans and Barbli (Winz) Leeman.





FREDERICK LEHMANN IN THE SEVENTH MINNESOTA REGIMENT

During the Sioux Uprising of 1862 (36)



In summer, 1862 Frederick Lehmann was working as a cabinet maker in Hastings, Minnesota, probably unaware of the plight of the state's Indian population, many of whom were starving in the aftermath of the previous year's corn crop failure. They resented the white man's deceitful treaties and were angry over continuing delays of promised annuities and supplies. Five thousand hungry Indians had gathered at the Yellow Medicine Agency on July 14 to demand food from warehoused provisions. This incident and a second confrontation by 500 Sioux three weeks later were both temporarily defused by distribution of some provisions.



Frederick was probably more aware of Minnesota's involvement in the Civil War. as the War Department notified Minnesota on August 4 that if its quota for 5362 new recruits was not met, the deficiency would be filled by a special draft. The next day Governor Ramsey ordered the organization of the Seventh Regiment of Volunteer Infantry. Thus Frederick may have anticipated action against the Confederacy when he was recruited at Hastings into Company F on August 14 by Captain John Kennedy. (37) (38)



On the day after he enlisted, Frederick would not have known about another event which was to contribute to his military destiny. For it was on August 15 that Chief Little Crow was at the Redwood Agency with hundreds of Indians in a dispute over credit and further distribution of provisions. Little Crow warned . . . "We have waited a long time. The money is ours but we cannot get it. We have no food but here are these stores filled with food. We ask that you, the agent, may some arrangement by which we can get food from the stores or else we may take our own way to keep ourselves from starving. When men are hungry, they help themselves." .....When asked by Indian Agent, Thomas Gailbraith, for a response, trader Andrew Myrick replied, "So far as I am concerned, if they are hungry, let them eat grass." In relating this exchange William Folwell comments on its implications:.... "The heartless and insolent statement of the trader must have deeply incensed the Indians. In his reply Colonel Sibley's split-stick message left on the birch Coulee battlefield, Little Crow gave it as one of the reasons for beginning the war, naming the trader who made it and quoting his words with an addition variously rendered. Myrick was one of the first to be shot to death on the morning of the outbreak and when his body was found by a burial party from Sibley's column, the mouth was stuffed with the grass commended to the Indians for food." (39)



Two days later the massacre of two families by four Sioux Indians in Acton township signaled the outbreak of the uprising, thus drastically changing any thoughts Frederick might have had about his regiment facing combat in the South. During the next five days hundreds of settlers were murdered in numerous attacks by Sioux war parties throughout the Minnesota Valley. The Yellow Medicine and Redwood agencies were attacked. Scores of people fled from their homes. An expedition of soldiers from Fort Ridgely had been ambushed. The Fort itself, which was just a cluster of frame buildings, and the town of New Ulm had each repulsed two bloody attacks. As the Sioux were terrorizing the region, the War of the Rebellion then became a secondary matter to Minnesotans. Consequently Frederick and his comrades in Company F were sent to Fort Snelling where troops were being mobilized to fight the Indians. A Seventh Regiment narrative by Sergeant J.T. Ramer of Company B suggests that Companies A, B, F, and G were then sent to Fort Ridgely where they joined General Sibley's expedition in rescuing an embattled unit at Birch Cooley. Folwell describes Sibley's expedition as "his whole remaining force of six companies of the Seventh, which had reached his camp that day" (Sept 3). He does not name the companies. A narrative written years later by Captain Hiram Grant of Company A, Sixth Regiment says "General Sibley immediately ordered Col. Crooks with the remainder of the regiment" (the Sixth) "and Col William R. Marshall who had arrived that day with his regiment" (the Seventh") "to start at once to our support" (40) (41)



Ramer's account suggests that they Company F may have been with Company B between August 27th and Sept 18th . . . "August 27th we received marching orders and at six o'clock all of the Seventh Regiment then at the fort - Companies A, B, F and G - started by boat and arrived at Shakopee next morning." The next day each soldier was issued sixteen rounds of ammunition before starting for Fort Ridgely in mid-afternoon. They marched ten miles before camping for the night. On Sept 2 they reached Fort Ridgely where they barely had time for supper before being ordered out on a march to reinforce forces which had gone earlier to relieve Company A and others who were besieged at Birch Coolie. (42)



Frederick missed breakfast the next day when the soldiers were called into a skirmish line at daybreak on Sept. 3. As they advanced two miles, Indians opened fire at them from long range. By ten o'clock they reached Company A's camp where they found . . . "A sorrowful scene. Some of the survivors tried to cheer, others only shed silent tears; some begged for water and others for something to eat. They had been besieged and fought thirty-six hours without water and having but little to eat. The tents and wagons were riddled with bullets. In looking over the camp we found thirteen dead soldiers and thirty-nine wounded, many of whom died. Ninety horses lay dead at the picket rope, one only still standing, but he was wounded; a colt was standing near its dead mother." After tending to the wounded the relief soldiers finally had something to eat. Frederick probably ate fried salt pork plus a cake made of flour and water and then fried in pork fat. Perhaps he helped bury the dead or maybe he helped get the wounded into wagons. Whatever he did, he and the rest of the soldiers then returned to Fort Ridgley, reaching it about midnight after marching fifty-four miles in two days with virtually no rest. (43)



On or about September 15 Frederick was left on guard duty at Fort Ridgely until after nightfall. Then he and eight other soldiers had to "double-quick" to overtake the Seventh Regiment, perhaps across the Minnesota River near the fort where companies A, B, F, G, and H were all encamped on the south side of a lake. He was then immediately placed upon guard duty again. Despite the cold and frosty weather, Frederick had not been issued an overcoat due to a supply problem which was affecting the Seventh Regiment at this time. He then developed a severe cold which was later listed as the cause of a liver complaint leading to his discharge Frederick may have been with his regiment until Sept 18th or 19th when Sibley's command of 1450 men began moving north. He may then have been sent back to the fort because of his severe cold. In any case he was treated at the hospital in Fort Ridgely on or about Sept 20. (44) (45) (46)



Illness among the soldiers and the lack of supplies were only a couple of the many difficulties plaguing the hastily organized expedition. Frederick may well have been aware of the many conduct problems among the undisciplined troops. From a review of Colonel Sibley's letters to his wife between Aug. 25 and Sept 15, Folwell noted that: .... "His undisciplined soldiers caused him trouble. He has to stay up nights to watch his guards. He found some of the men committing acts of wanton mischief and appropriating private property without authority and he was obliged to direct company officers to report such offenders for punishment. He had to forbid shooting in camp or elsewhere without leave and selling liquor without his express permission. He also found it necessary to order the arrest of civilians represented as making unauthorized impressments of horses and wagons with which to carry off stolen property." (47)



Besides being a cold and sick recruit in the midst of unruly troops, Frederick may not yet have been paid his enlistment bounty. In an appeal to Governor Alexander Ramsey on Sept 14, Sibley reported that his soldiers had not received such payment and were "sadly troubled" (48)



Sometime after his Sept 20 treatment at Fort Ridgley Frederick caught up to his company in time to be involved with the "Battle of Wood Lake" on Sept 23. He probably rejoined his comrades no later than Sept 22 when the Seventh Regiment arrived in the vicinity of the Yellow Medicine River and Lone Tree Lake (mistakenly identified by a guide as Wood Lake, hence the erroneous name of the battle). Frederick and his regiment were posted to the right rear of a ravine through which the lake's outlet streamed. There they probably spent the night unaware that the Sioux would be preparing an ambush for the next day. (49) (50)



Early in the morning Frederick must have heard the gunfire when a foraging party of soldiers was fired upon less than a half mile from camp. The battle then erupted with the Third Regiment being the first troop in combat. As the fighting progressed, Sibley observed a movement of Indians toward the ravine. He ordered Colonel Marshall, commanding the Seventh Regiment and one company of the Sixth, to repel them. Accordingly Frederick and his fellow soldiers drove back the Sioux in a decisive action of the battle which effectively ended the uprising. (51)



Resting for the next two days, Frederick may or may not have anticipated the next move, the rescue of hundreds of captives who might now be in danger of being slaughtered. Sibley had learned of dissension among the Indians and that some friendly half-breeds had established a separate encampment and apparently had secured the safety of the captives, at least for the time being. On Sept 25 he marched the expedition to the Hazelwood mission which had been deserted a month earlier in the first few days of the Sioux terrorism. Here Frederick participated in a dress parade of the command - perhaps held to raise the soldiers' morale and to further intimidate the Indians. (52) (53)



The next morning meant another march for Frederick as Sibley moved his army a short distance north of where the friendly Indians were holding the captives. About 2:00 P.M. Sibley entered the camp where 269 captives (107 whites and 162 mixed blood) were delivered to him over the next few days. They were taken to Sibley's encampment (which he had dubbed "Camp Release") and from there were sent to Fort Ridgely. About twelve hundred Indians were taken into custody with more prisoners added daily as the Sioux, many of whom were starving, surrendered under flags of truce over the next few days. Eventually Frederick and his fellow soldiers saw nearly two thousand Indians captured. With mass trials of Indians beginning at Camp Release on Sept 28, Colonel Marshall and Major George Bradley represented Frederick's regiment on the five man commission appointed by Sibley. Frederick's presence at Camp Release during this time is documented by his muster record for October 3, the date when he finally received his enlistment bounty payment. (54) (55) (56)



Frederick apparently was at Camp Release from Sept 27 until Oct 4 when Company F was one of three companies sent to the Upper Agency (Yellow Medicine) guarding some 1250 Indian prisoners, comprising about 200 lodges. This was done so that prisoners could be fed from corn and potatoes they gathered from fields which had been farmed by the Indians. (57) (58)



On Oct 13 Frederick may have participated in a ruse disarming and arresting more Indians at Yellow Medicine. An interpreter notified uncaptured Indians in the area to appear so that they could be counted in order to receive unpaid annuities. As the families appeared and were counted, the men were asked to step inside a doorway to be counted for additional pay. As they did so, they were asked to relinquish their arms, which would be returned "shortly." Thus, 236 of Little Crow's warriors were placed in leg irons. (59)



The weather was not helping Frederick's efforts to recover from his illness. In nearby Camp Release, Oct 21 was reported to be "a most dismal day, a blizzard blowing ashes and cinders from the burned prairie that darkened the air worse than a snowstorm. (60)



Camp Release was abandoned b y Sibley on Oct 24 with the entire command marching to the Lower Agency (Redwood), arriving on Oct 26 where they established Camp Sibley. It is not clear whether Frederick and the other soldiers at the Upper Agency had rejoined the command at this time. However he was most probably with them on Nov 8 when the whole command with 303 condemned prisoners, shackled in wagons, embarked for Mankato. At New Ulm, angry men, women and children; some of whom had been reburying their dead, attacked the prisoners with brickbats and other missiles, wounding fifteen Indians and some guards before being repelled by a bayonet charge. They arrived at Camp Lincoln by the mouth of the Blue Earth River, on Nov 10 where the camping was described as "cold and dreary." (61) (62)



It was not long before Frederick and his fellow soldiers again had to contend with an attack by vengeful settlers. At about 11:00 P.M. on Dec 4, guards of the Indian prisoners were assaulted by nearly 200 men intent on murdering the captives. The next day the prisoners were transferred to a safer log structure in Mankato. (63) (64)



On he following day Abraham Lincoln approved the execution order for only 39 of the 303 prisoners who had been condemned by the military commission. The execution was scheduled for Dec 19 and then postponed to Dec 26. The interim must have been a time of much tension for Frederick and the other guard. Martial law had been declared in the Mankato area with a special patrol established to enforce a prohibition of the dispensing of intoxicating liquors. In the week before the execution, missionaries were engaged in baptizing most of the doomed men who were allowed to say goodbye to relatives on the 24th and 25th. Frederick probably heard the Indians' death chants beginning early on the morning of Dec 26. He was probably one of the fourteen hundred soldiers surrounding the gallows which had been built in the Mankato public square. If so, he would have seen the 39 condemned Indians marched from the prison to the scaffold at with chains removed and arms bound with cords. He would have heard the chanting cease as soldiers, over the Indians' objections, placed on each head a white cap which would be rolled down over the face before the execution. He would have seen the Indians crouching in silence, some listening to the priest, Father Ravoux, who had baptized 24 of them, and some painting their faces. He would have heard the Sioux death chant, "Hi-yi-yi" resume as the prisoners were positioned on the gallows with caps over their faces as a drumbeat commenced. Finally he would have heard a prolonged cheer from the crowd as the platform fell after the rope had been cut by a survivor of an early massacre. (65) (66)



It is unclear where Frederick was and what he was doing in the eight weeks following the execution. His regiment was assigned to guard the remaining 266 prisoners until spring when they would be sent to Davenport, Iowa, and then to the Sioux reservation on the Missouri River. But the Seventh Regiment, headquartered at Mankato, was also deployed as guards in a "a line of posts westward and southward through Madelia and Fairmont to the Iowa border." (67) (68)



If Frederick remained in Mankato to guard the remaining captives, he would have been aware of the increased missionary work among the prisoners. About two weeks after the execution, convicts began to speak, pray, and sing in evening prayer meetings. On Feb 3, 1863, 274 Indians were baptized with more than thirty more baptized later, most of them before the end of the month. These figures indicate that additional prisoners wee probably collected at Mankato after the execution. Prisoners were also learning to read and write, resulting in the sending of 400 letters to convicts' families. (69)



Wherever he was earlier, Frederick was definitely at Indian Post, Mankato, on Feb 17, 1863. He was examined by the post surgeon and declared to be "incapable of performing the duties of a soldier because of chronic hepatitis following an attack of billious fever subsequent to enlistment." Presumably he was hospitalized or on limited duty until his disability discharge on March 25, 1863, at Mankato. His discharge certificate states that he "has been unfit for duty 61 days." (70)







HASTINGS, MINNESOTA: 1863 - 1876



No information has surfaced to prove or disprove the family legend's statement that Frederick Lehmann was nursed by Mary Margaret Roller at a hospital in St. Paul. But less than seven months later the two were married in Hastings, Minnesota on Oct 5, 1863. Mary's sister, Barbara, was present at the wedding. Frederick and Mary were probably drawn to each other at least partly because of a common language. Mary, Barbara, and their brother, Jacob had all immigrated from Germany. In 1860 the three Rollers were living at Cannon Falls, Minnesota, in the household of William and Mary Jane Mussey. (71) (72)



Frederick and Mary settled into life at Hastings where their first five children were born: John on Aug 27, 1864; Frank in March 1866; Fred in 1868; Bertha in 1870; and Albert on May 15, 1872. During their years in Hastings, Frederick built a successful career as a cabinet maker. In 1872 he became one of the charter members of the Hermann Lodge, No. 85 International Order of Odd Fellows. (73) But early in their marriage they must have had concerns about Mary's brother,

Jacob Roller, who was displaying signs of what was perceived as insanity at least as early as 1867 when some problematic behavior led to his being restrained or confined. At the time he may have been still living with William and Mary Mussey at Cannon Falls where he had been so listed on the 1865 Minnesota State Census which recorded him as "insane." However he was listed as a head of household and farmer in Cannon Falls on the 1870 census. Altero Iverson, age 22, was the only other person in his household. (74) (75)



By 1874 he was under guardianship. An order by the Goodhue County Court on March 14, 1874 authorized Henry Cook, Guardian of Jacob Roller, to sell Jacob's real estate On April 7, Henry Cook promised to use his best judgement in fixing time place of sale - "to the advantage of all persons interested in the said real estate." The court record described John Jacob as "an insane person" For at least the next five weeks Jacob must have been living with Frederick Lehmann and his family as a court record for August 31 notes that Henry Cook, Guardian of John Jacob Roller, paid Frederick "$15 for 5 weeks board of JJ Roller to date at $3.0 per week." His episodic disturbances eventually led to the Goodhue County Probate Court ordering an examination by Dr. J.E. Tebbets and Dr. T. Conley to determine "the fact of his sanity or insanity." Responses to questions suggest an interview and/or questionnaire with one or more informants in July 1877. The informant(s) are not named in the record but may have William and/or Mary Mussey. Jacob was again living with the Musseys in 1875 and was owning land adjacent to them in 1877. (76) Or it may have been one of his brothers-in-law, Jacob Rauscher or Frederick Rauscher, who were married respectively to Anna Marie Roller and to Anna Catherine Roller. Both Rauscher families were living in Dakota County in 1870 (77) and perhaps one or both were still there in 1877. It is unlikely that the informant(s) would have been anybody in the household of Jacob's sister, Anna Barbara (Roller) Colson, who was listed on the 1875 Minnesota State Census with her husband, John, in Oak Valley, Ottertail county. (78) Nor was it likely to have been Frederick or Mary Lehmann who had moved to Oak Valley in 1876 and were living there in 1877 when their sixth child, George, was born on June 3. (79) (80) Perhaps the move of his sisters aggravated Jacob's condition. (81)



.

The detailed responses to questions in Jacob Roller's "examination" are as follows:



"What have been his habits as regard temperance and morality? - "Good, Very good"



"What relatives, if any, have been insane?" - "His sisters had been out of mind"



"What is the form of this attack?" - "Depressed"



"Is this the first attack?" - -"It is not"



"If not, when did others occur and what was the duration of each?" - "First attack lasted one year. Second attack lasted about ___, three years after first. Third attack ___nearly a year. Fourth - same. This, the fifth and lasts for nearly three years ago." .(This suggests a history of episodes over previous ten years - back to about 1867)



"On what subjects, or in what way is insanity now manifested?" "General wandering"



"Has he ever shown any disposition to injure others, and if so, was it from sudden passion or premeditation?" - "He shows passion when excited"



"Has suicide ever been attempted?" "No"



"Is there any disposition to filthy habits, destruction of clothing, etc.? - "No"



"Has he been subject to any bodily disease?"

"He had hemorioids at times."



"Has restraint or confinement ever been employed?"

"Never since the first attack."...... (Perhaps 1867?)





The examination on July 18, 1877 resulted in commitment of Jacob to the St. Peter State Hospital for the Insane. His diagnosis is unknown but all patients were diagnosed as "mania" or "melancholy" or "dementia" . . . "Any patient presenting with agitation was said to have mania, regardless of the evident cause. Diagnoses were assigned at admission and were never changed regardless of any new information or perception that might be gained during the hospitalization. The annual reports were based on the admission diagnoses and are thus inaccurate." (82)



Nine months later Jacob Roller died of "Phthisis pulmonalis" ( tuberculosis) on April 17, 1878. It is very possible that he contracted the disease at the hospital where "Phthisis pulmonalis occurred frequently and was a major cause of mortality among the patients and staff alike. It was not recognized to be contagious, and the different manifestations were referred to as different disorders." . Nothing specific is known about the care and treatment of Jacob at the hospital but there was always concern over the attendants' drinking and possible abuse of patients. Some attendants were "discharged as patient, hired as staff, sometimes on the same ward" . . . "A number of patients stayed on as employees when they were discharged from the hospital, including one woman who had been an opium addict and another who had murdered his family only two years before." (83)





OAK VALLEY 1876 - 1895



Little is known about the life of Frederick Lehmann and his family at Oak Valley. They came there in 1876 and located on a farm in which became section 12 when the township was organized on Jan 2, 1877. (84) At Oak Valley they were neighbors to John Colson who married Mary's sister, Anna Barbara Roller. Mary's brothers-in-law, Jacob and Frederick Rauscher, both moved to Compton (then Oak Valley) after the deaths of their respective wives, Anna Maria (Roller) Rauscher (died before 1880) and Anna Catherine (Roller) Rauscher (died 1881) (85) (86)



Farming may have been difficult for Frederick and other Minnesota farmers as episodic grasshopper plagues decimated crops from 1874 through 1878. Bounties and tarred iron pans were used as part of the war on locusts. One version says that the plagues ended in the spring of 1877. when Governor Pillsbury "resorted to a rather unusual expedient in his war upon the grasshoppers. He appointed April 26 as a day of prayer and called upon the people to lay aside their usual vocations, repair to their houses of worship, and as Providence for deliverance. Unbelievers as well as believers joined in compliance with the governor's request. 'The very next night it turned cold and froze every grasshopper in the state stiff, froze them solid." (87)



Frederick's family expanded during his years at Oak Valley. Their three youngest children were born there, George in 1877, Otto in 1883, and Ernest in 1888. Four of Frederick's children married. John married Mary Ann Marshall on Feb 25, 1894 and presented Frederick with his first grandson, Erwin Lehmann, born in 1897. Bertha married John Zimmerman Dec 24 1888. Her first child, Loyal, was born June 26, 1893. Frederick married Anna Edith Naylor in 1890. Their first son, Albert, was born on Apr 22, 1893 but died five months later on September 3. Their second son, Clyde, was born Dec 23, 1894. (88) George Lehmann married Mary Peterson in 1898 (89) . . . (90)



In the summer of 1885 Frederick might have taken his family to Wadena to see the first circus to come to that town. It was W.H. Harris's Nickel Plate Shows. If so, he may have witnessed a fight between some of the performers and some men from Deer Creek. The circus people got the worst of it and were driven into their rooms at the Merchants' Hotel. If the Lehmanns missed that event, perhaps they attended the much larger "John Robinson's Ten Big Shows" at Wadena on June 14, 1890. However John Robinson was notorious for giving shortened or briefer-than-advertised performances without valid reason. Because the public came away feeling cheated, the practice tended to burn the territory against other circuses. (91)



Frederick very well may have gone to Wadena in 1890 to attend the first encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic. (92)



FINAL YEARS IN WADENA 1895- 1903



In 1895 Frederick and Mary Lehmann moved from Oak Valley to Wadena. In 1898, the year of the Spanish American War, their son, Albert joined a National Guard company of volunteers in Wadena. (93) It was reported that Albert, who was then attending the University of Minnesota, "enlisted," being "the first Wadena boy to go." (94) However, for some unknown reason, he did not actually go. (95)



Frederick's family continued to expand in Wadena between 1895 and 1903. Otto married Eunice Little sometime before 29 Feb 1900 when their first child, Rex, was born. George Lehmann married Mary Peterson in 1898. Their first child, Gladys, was born about 1900. Albert Lehmann married Nellie French on Christmas day, 1901. Their first child, Bryce, was born 6 Sept 1902. John and Mary Ann Lehmann had two more children, Erwin, born 13 June 1897 and Robert, born 19 Feb 1902. (96) Bertha (Lehmann) Zimmerman's second child, Wayne, was born 15 Jan 1897. He was destined to become a Major General, Inspector General of the U.S. Army in 1956, and Chief of the U.S. Military Mission in Tehran, Iran, in 1951-52. (97)



In September 1903 Frederick and Mary Lehmann were probably living on 4th Street, Gardiner's Addition, Wadena. The 1900 census listed them there with Albert and Ernest still in their household. Presumably Ernest Lehmann was still there in 1903 but Albert Lehmann was then the superintendent of schools in McIntosh, North Dakota. Otto Lehmann was also living in North Dakota, working for the Dower Lumber Company at Wyndmere. Frank Lehmann, Frederick Lehmann Jr., and Bertha (Lehmann) Zimmerman were all living in Wadena. George Lehmann was living either in Oak Valley or in Wadena. John Lehmann was living in nearby Hewitt.



On Monday, Sept 22 Frederick was busy all day, digging potatoes in his garden and carrying them to the cellar for the winter. Frederick Lehmann apparently awoke early the next morning and ate a hearty breakfast. He was reportedly "in the best of spirits." He then went downtown where he made a few purchases at the stores. He returned about 9:00 or 10:00 A.M and went to the barn where he had a work bench and frequently did odd jobs. During the noon hour, Frank came to the home for dinner and inquired after his father and was informed that he was in the barn. According to Sept 25, 1903 "Wadena Pioneer Journal" . . . "Frank went out to call him for dinner and was horrified beyond expression to find the lifeless body of his father. He had tied a cord from a beam, slipped a noose around his neck, and fell forward. His feet were on the floor and his head was only a few feet from the ground. Dr. Babcock was hastily summoned but medical aid was of no avail. Dr. McKinnon, the coroner, was also there and decided that no inquest was needed . . . It is hard to account for the suicide. Mr. Lehmann had no cause that anyone knows. His affairs were in good shape, he being in comfortable circumstances, and his home life was happy and pleasant. It must be that a fit of insanity came upon him suddenly, as there is nothing to indicate that he had planned to do the deed . . . Frederick Lehmann was born in Switzerland 73 years ago, and when a young man came to this country. He was a cabinet maker by trade, and first located in Minnesota at Hastings. There he was married and his wife now survives him. Twenty-six years ago, he came to Oak Valley, and located upon a fine farm. He resided there until eight years ago, when he built himself a comfortable home in Wadena and moved to this city. He was an honest, sober, and industrious man, and by hard work and economy accumulated a comfortable competency which enabled to pass his closing life with ease and comfort . . . Mr. Lehmann was a member of the German Lutheran church. The family has much sympathy in their affliction, which under the circumstances is doubly sad. The funeral of Mr. Lehmann was held at St. Helen's Episcopal church yesterday morning and was largely attended. Rev. Murphy conducted the services. Mr. Lehmann was an Odd Fellow and the members of the local lodge, while not having charge of the services, attended in large numbers." (98) (99)







SOME DESCENDANTS OF

JOHANN JACOB BAUMBERGER AND ANNA LEEMAN

Johann Jacob Baumberger, son of Johann or Hans Baumberger and Susanna Stebler, was born 23 Jul 1810 in Koppigen, Bern, Switzerland and died there on 24 Aug 1868. (100) (101) Johann married Anna Leeman, daughter of Samuel Lehmann and Maria Christen, on 18 Sep 1829 in Koppigen, Bern, Switzerland. Anna was born on 27 Aug 1809 in Utzenstorf, Bern, Switzerland and died on 27 Feb 1878 in Koppigen . They had five children, all born at Koppigen. The eldest was Jacob, born 7 March 1830. Nothing further has been learned about Jacob. The second oldest child was Johann Baumberger (Aka Frederick Lehmann), born 2 Jan 1832. and died 23 Sept 1903 in Wadena, Minnesota. The last three children all died young at Koppigen. . Vinzens Baumberger was born 3 Sept 1834 and died 20 Feb 1840. Verena Baumberger was born 13 Dec 1836 and died 18 Apr 1837. Albrecht Baumberger was born in Feb 1838 and died 21 Mar 1838. (102) (103)



Johann (Frederick Lehmann) Baumberger was born 2 Jan 1832 at Koppigen and died 23 Sep 1903 in Wadena, Minnesota . . . (104) (105) (106) Johann married Mary Margaret Roller, daughter of Johann Jakob Roller and Anna Maria Reusch, on 5 Oct 1863 in Hastings, Minnesota. Mary Margaret Roller was born 20 Jan 1841 in Kleinbettlingen, Wurttemberg, Germany, and died on 5 Oct 1926 in Wadena, Minnesota. She and Frederick are buried in Wadena, Minnesota. They had eight children: John, Frank, Frederick, Bertha, Albert, George, Otto, and Ernest. (107) (108)



John Lehmann was born 27 Aug 1864 in Hastings, Minnesota, died in 1942, and is buried in Wadena. John married Mary Ann Marshall on 25 Feb 1874 in Minnesota. Mary Ann Marshall was born on 25 Feb 1874 in Iowa, died on 4 Aug 1937 at age 63, and is buried in Wadena, Minnesota. They had six children: Florence Lillian, Erwin Stanley, Robert, Irene, Clarence, and Edna. (109)



Frank Lehmann was born 14 Jan 1867 in Hastings and died on 10 Sep 1946 in Wadena where he is buried . . . Frank married Mame Carlson on 30 May 1905 in Wadena. . Mame was born o24 Jul 1885 and died on 10 Apr 1961. They had four children: Edwin, Evelyn, Melvin, and Bernice Amelia. (110)



Frederick Lehmann Jr. was born 27 Sep 1869 in Hastings and died on 13 Jan 1947 in Wadena, where he too is buried. Frederick married Anna Edith Naylor in 1890 in Minnesota. Anna was born 11 May 1870 and died on 20 June 1966. They had seven children: Albert, Clyde, Harriet Fern, Sarah Esther, Edward Bus, Margaret, and (111) (112)Ruth.



Bertha Lehmann was born 4 May 1870 in Hastings and died in 1950 in Minneapolis. Bertha married John Zimmerman on 24 Dec 1888. John was born about 1863 in Wright County, Iowa and was killed December 17, 1918 at Wadena in an agonizing engine house accident when he fell into a main drive belt . . . Bertha and John had two children: Loyal and Wayne. (113) (114)



Albert Lehmann was born 8 Mar 1875 in Hastings and died of throat cancer on 11 Dec 1961 at Wadena. (115) (116) Albert married Nellie French, daughter of Louis Daniel French and Mary Ellen Dower, on 25 Dec 1901 in Thomastown, Minnesota. (117) Nellie was born 6 Sep 1878 in Wadena County and died of polycystic kidneys on June 9, 1931 at Wadena. She and Albert are both buried in Wadena. (118). They had two children: Bryce and Louis. (119) (120) Albert next married Mabel Boyd on 5 Aug 1953 in Wadena, Minnesota. (121).



George Lehmann was born in June 1877 in Wadena County and died on 28 Dec 1968 in Freeborn County, Minnesota at age 91. George married Mary Peterson in 1898 in Minnesota. Mary Peterson was born in 1878 in Minnesota. They had five children: Gladys, Ralph, Helen, Ethel, and Kenneth. (122)



Otto Lehmann 22 was born 15 May 1880 in Oak Valley, Minnesota and died on 15 Feb 1959 in Minneapolis. (123) Otto married Eunice Little who was born on 15 Dec 1882 in River Falls, Wisconsin and died on 2 June 1950 in Minneapolis. Otto and Eunice had nine children: Rex, Farma, Crystal, Kathryn, Stephen, Ione, Edith, Virgil, and Constance. (124)



Ernest Lehmann was born 7 Aug 1888 and died in 1954 at Longview, Washington, where he is buried in the Longview Memorial Park cemetery. About 1910 he married Bertha Fish who was born about 1890 in Iowa. Ernest and Bertha had three children: Vaida, Marion, and Marietta (125) (126) (127)

THE ROLLER FAMILY IN GERMANY AND AMERICA (128)



The Roller family did not all come to America at the same time. In 1860 Mary Margaret Roller, age 19; Barbara Roller, age 22; and John Jacob Roller, age 28 were all in Minnesota. Another sister, Dorothea Roller, married Frederick Keiser on July 20, 1860 in Perry County, Indiana. Two other sisters, Anna Maria Roller and Anna Catherine Roller, were married to brothers named Jacob and Frederick Rauscher in Kleinbettlingen, Germany and came to America in 1867. Listed on the passenger ship, "The City of New York," on May 13, 1867 are Jacob Rauscher, 32; Marie, 32; Heinr, 5; Frederick, 30; Catherine, 24; Catherine, 5; Rike, three; Frederick, six months. Also listed with this family is Anna Roller, 60, the mother of the two wives. Their father, Jacob Roller, died on Jan 20, 1866 in Germany.



The two Rauscher families lived briefly in Vermillion, Dakota County, Minnesota. Frederick and Catherine moved to Randolph, Minnesota where six more children were born; Lena, Jacob, Clara, Margaret, Amelia and Lydia. Anna Rauscher died before 1878, leaving one child, Anna Maria. Jacob Rauscher remarried, had five more children and moved to Compton, Minnesota. Catherine Rauscher died on Oct 5, 1881. Frederick remarried twice and had at least one more child, Rose. He moved to Compton and died in Wadena. Mary Roller Lehmann's obituary in 1926 states that all of her sisters preceded her in death. Her death certificate lists her father's name as Jacob Roller.



Frederick Rauscher died on Nov 7, 1914 in Wadena. His obituary states that he was born in Aulingen, Munsingen County, Wurttemberg, Germany and that he was married to his first wife, Catherine for 19 years.



Parents of Mary Margaret, Anna Barbara, John Jacob, Anna Marie, Dorothea, and Anna Catherine were Johann Jakob Roller and Anna Maria Reusch. Johann Jakob was a farmer, born Jan 30, 1796, died Jan 20, 1866 at Kleinbettlingen, Wurttemberg, Germany. Anna Maria Reusch was born June 17, 1806 at Neuhausen, Wurttemberg, Germany. They were married Nov 8, 1827 at Kleinbettlingen. Two other children died in infancy. Christian Roller was born June 7, 1828 and died April 28, 1832. Johann Jakob Roller was born Mar 5, 1830 and died on the same day



Johann Jakob Roller's parents were Phllip Friedrich Roller, butcher, and Maria Margaretha Greusch. The parents of Anna Maria Reusch were Ulrich Reusch, vintner, and Anna Barbara Veyl who were married May 3, 1796 at Neuhausen, Germany.





SOME DESCENDANTS OF

JOHANN JAKOB ROLLER AND ANNA MARIA REUSCH



Johann Jakob Roller, son of Philip Freidrich Roller and Maria Margaretha Greusch, was born 30 Jan 1796 in Germany and died 20 Jan 1866 in Kleinbettlingen, Wurttemberg, Germany. Johann married Anna Maria Reusch, daughter of Ulrich Reusch and Anna Barbara Veyl, on 8 Nov 1827 in Kleinbettlingen. Anna was born 17 Jun 1806 in Neuhausen, Germany and died after 13 May 1867 in the United States. They had eight children: Christian, Johann Jakob, Johann Jacob, Anna Maria, Dorothea, Anna Barbara, Mary Margaret, and Anna Catherine. (129) (130) (131) (132)



Christian Roller was born on 7 Jun 1828 in Kleinbettlingen and died there on 28 Apr 1832. Johann Jakob Roller was born 5 Mar 1830 in Kleinbettlingen, and died there on 5 Mar 1830 . (133)



Johann Jacob Roller was born 15 Feb 1832 in Kleinbettlingen, and died on 17 Apr 1878 in St. Peter, Minnesota.. (134)



Anna Maria Roller was born 4 Sep 1834 in Kleinbettlingen and died before 1880. Anna married Jacob Rauscher on 25 Apr 1861 in Bempflingen, Germany. Jacob was born about 1834 in Germany. (135)



Dorothea Roller was born 24 Sep 1836 in Kleinbettlingen and died on 2 Sep 1913 in Tell City, Indiana. Dorothea married Frederick Keiser on 20 Jul 1860 in Perry, Indiana. Frederick Keiser was born about 1823 in Germany. They had seven children, all born in Indiana: Henry - about 1861, Mary - about 1865, Frederick - about 1868, Caroline - about 1870, William - born 25 Sept 1871, Robert - born 27 Mar 1874, and Hermann - born 27 July 1877. William Keiser married Susan Agnes Carr on 27 Apr 1896. Susan was born on 25 Mar 1881 in Kentucky. They had seven children: Hermann Joseph Keiser, John Henry Ellis Keiser, George Preston Keiser, Mary Keiser, Theodore Keiser, Henry Keiser, and Dorothy Keiser. (136) (137) (138) (139)



Anna Barbara Roller was born on 13 Apr 1838 in Kleinbettlingen and died on 13 Oct 1914 in Wadena. She married John Colson on 7 Oct 1867 in Cannon Falls, Minnesota. John was born in Aug 1839 in Goteburg, Sweden. They had six children, all born in Minnesota: William - about 1870, Pauline - Feb 1871, Edward - June 1872, Louis - born 14 Aug 1874 at Hastings and died 6 April 1958 at Wadena, Mathilda - born about 1877, and Emma - born Sept 1882. Louis Colson married Metta Louise Damon in Oct 1905. Metta was born about 1876 in Minnesota. They had four children: Kathyrn, Elizabeth, Barbara, and Henry. (140)

(141)



Mary Margaret Roller was born 20 Jan 1841 in Kleinbettlingen and died 5 Oct 1926 in Wadena. She married Johann (Frederick Lehmann) Baumberger, son of Johann Jacob Baumberger and Anna Leeman, on 5 Oct 1863 in Hastings, Minnesota. Johann was born 2 Jan 1832 in Koppigen, Bern, Switzerland and died on 23 Sep 1903 at Wadena. Johann (aka Frederick Lehmann) and Mary Margaret (Roller) Lehmann had eight children: John, Frank, Frederick, Bertha, Albert, George, Otto, and Ernest. (142) (143) (144) (145) (146) (147)



Anna Catherine Roller was born 12 Dec 1842 in Kleinbettlingen and died on 5 Oct 1881 in Randolph, Minnesota. Anna married Frederick Rauscher on 2 Mar 1862 in Bempflingen, Germany. Frederick was born about 1840 in Wurtenburgh. They had eight children: The first three were all born in Wurtenburgh: Ricker - about 1863, Kate - about 1865, and Fred - about 1866. The last five children were all born in Minnesota: Lena - about 1868, Jacob - about 1870, Clara - about 1872, Margaret - about 1874, and Amelia - about 1876. (148) (149)







END NOTES AND SOURCES

1. Lehmann, Louis "The Legend of Frederick Lehmann - Primarily an Account of his Brief Military Career in the Seventh Minnesota Infantry Regiment during the 1862 Sioux Uprisings in Minnesota" 1990..................... Minnesota Historical Society

2. Carlson, Lois Lehmann and Lehmann, Louis. "Ancestry and Descendants of Frederick Lehmann and Mary Roller".Unpublished booklet prepared for second Lehmann reunion in 1992 at St. Paul, Minnesota.

3. "The Descendants of Frederick Lehmann 1830-1903". Compiled by Louis Lehmann. 1994. Unpublished booklet prepared for third Lehmann reunion at Elk River, Minnesota.

4. U.S. IRS Tax Assessment Lists, 1862-1918 District 1; Monthly Lists; Jun 1864-Jan 1866 Ancestry.com

5. Koppigen civil records (Civil Register , Koppigen, Berne, Switzerland), 1/49 & 1/185.

6. Research by Egon Baumberger from Koppigen church books as per correspondence (May 18, 1996) between Egon Baumberger (Via al Funti, 6834 Morbio Inferiore, Switzerland) and Lois (Lehmann) Carlson

7. Koppigen civil records (Civil Register , Koppigen, Berne, Switzerland), 1/49 & 1/185.

8. Census: Iowa, Des Moines county, Burlington. Page 466

9. New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 (Ancestry.com)

10. Minnesota State census. 1857. Hennepin County, St. Anthony (Ancestry.com)

11. Census: 1860 Minnesota, Dakota county, Hastings

12. Marriage certificate for Frederick Lehmann and Mary Roller, Dakota County Courthouse.

13. Civil War military and pension records for Frederick Lehmann were obtained from the National Archives

14. Compiled by Christian M. Jaehne (Genealogocial Research in Germany), Protestant church

records - Kleinbettling and Bempflingen (Letter and copies of records sent to Lois Carlson 14 April 1992).

15. Gugen Griebfurts (Letter sent from Burgdorf (Switzerland), 11 April 1893 to Herr Theod. Guelich, Lawyer & Notary, 422 North Main St, Burlington, Iowa, North America authorizing distribution of fund from estate of deceased widow, Anna Weber born Baumberer who died on 29 May 1872 in Koppigen to her nephews including Johannes Baumberger (Frederick Lehmann) in Wadena.)

16. Research by Egon Baumberger from Koppigen church books as per correspondence (May 18, 1996) between Egon Baumberger (Via al Funti, 6834 Morbio Inferiore, Switzerland) and Lois (Lehmann) Carlson

17. Lois (Lehmann) Carlson had been exploring the possibility that a Jacob Baumberger who died on 22 Feb 1903 at the Mt .Pleasant Hospital for the Insane in Iowa (Henry county) may have been Johann's brother

18. Koppigen civil records (Civil Register , Koppigen, Berne, Switzerland), 1/49 & 1/185.

19. Lois (Lehmann) Carlson had indicated that she found a source for the information that a Jacob Baumberger who died on 22 Feb 1903 at the Mt .Pleasant Hospital for the Insane in Iowa (Henry county) may have been Johann's brother. However I have not been able to locate that source

20. History of Switzerland - A Timeline of Switzerland's History Downloaded 26 Aug 2009

http://history-switzerland.geschichte-schweiz.ch/timeline-switzerlands-history.html

21. Research by Egon Baumberger from Koppigen church books as per correspondence (May 18, 1996) between Egon Baumberger (Via al Funti, 6834 Morbio Inferiore, Switzerland) and Lois (Lehmann) Carlson

22. Koppigen civil records (Civil Register , Koppigen, Berne, Switzerland), 1/49 & 1/185.

23. History of Switzerland - A Time line of Switzerland's History Downloaded 26 Aug 2009

http://history-switzerland.geschichte-schweiz.ch/Time line-switzerlands-history.html

24. Koppigen civil records (Civil Register , Koppigen, Berne, Switzerland), 1/49 & 1/185

25. History of Switzerland - "Swiss Revolution and the Helvetic Republic (1798)"

Downloaded 26 Aug 2009 http://history-switzerland.geschichte-schweiz.ch/swiss-revolution-helvetic-republic-1798.html

Swiss Revolution and the Helvetic Republic (1798)

26. For several centuries, young Swiss men, especially from Central Switzerland, had served French kings and Italian dukes in mercenary troops. During the French Revolution a detachment of 800 mercenary troops from Switzerland tried to defend the king against the Montagnards [radical party in the French Revolution] attacking the castle of the Tuileries in 1792. All mercenary troops were killed. The Lion Monument in Lucerne reminds of the infamous end to the Swiss military force that had once been feared throughout Europe (History of Switzerland - "Swiss Revolution and the Helvetic Republic (1798)" Downloaded 26 Aug 2009 http://history-switzerland.geschichte-schweiz.ch/swiss-revolution-helvetic-republic-1798.html

Swiss Revolution and the Helvetic Republic (1798)

27. Research by Egon Baumberger from Koppigen church books as per correspondence (May 18, 1996) between Egon Baumberger (Via al Funti, 6834 Morbio Inferiore, Switzerland) and Lois (Lehmann) Carlson

28. History of Switzerland - "Swiss Revolution and the Helvetic Republic (1798)"

Downloaded 26 Aug 2009 http://history-switzerland.geschichte-schweiz.ch/swiss-revolution-helvetic-republic-1798.html

Swiss Revolution and the Helvetic Republic (1798)

29. Koppigen civil records (Civil Register , Koppigen, Berne, Switzerland), 1/49 & 1/185.

30. Research by Egon Baumberger from Koppigen church books as per correspondence (May 18, 1996) between Egon Baumberger (Via al Funti, 6834 Morbio Inferiore, Switzerland) and Lois (Lehmann) Carlson

31. History of Switzerland "A Timeline of Switzerland's History" Downloaded 26 Aug 2009 http://history-switzerland.geschichte-schweiz.ch/timeline-switzerlands-history.html

32. "Mathematics History" "STEINER, J.(1796-1863) "

Downloaded 26 Aug 2009 http://library.thinkquest.org/22584/temh3028.htm

33. Koppigen civil records (Civil Register , Koppigen, Berne, Switzerland), 1/49 & 1/185.

34. Parish Records, Utzenstorf, Bern, Switzerland, Christening Register Vol. 6. p. 240.

35. Research by Egon Baumberger from Koppigen church books as per correspondence (May 18, 1996) between Egon Baumberger (Via al Funti, 6834 Morbio Inferiore, Switzerland) and Lois (Lehmann) Carlson

36. Material in "Frederick Lehmann of Company F in the Seventh Minnesota Regiment During the Sioux Uprising of 1862" is largely from: Lehmann, Louis "The Legend of Frederick Lehmann - Primarily an Account of his Brief Military Career in the Seventh Minnesota Infantry Regiment during the 1862 Sioux Uprisings in Minnesota". 1990. Minnesota Historical Society. Passages by and references to authors from this booklet are credited again by endnotes.

37. Volunteer Enlistment form signed by Frederick Lehmann. Hastings, Minnesota Aug 14, 1862

38. "Declaration of Recruit" signed by Frederick Lahman, August 14, 1862

39. Folwell, William W. A History of Minnesota Vol II Minnesota Historical Society: 1924. Pages 232-3.

40. Minnesota in the Civil and Indian Wars: 1861-1865. Vol I. Board of Commissioners Appointed by the Act of the Legislature of Minnesota of April 16, 1889. Pioneer Press Co., St. Paul, Minn. 1890. Pages 309, 350

41. Folwell, William W. A History of Minnesota Vol II Page 155

42. Minnesota in the Civil and Indian Wars: 1861-1865. Vol I. Pages 309, 350

43. Ibid Pages 309, 350

44. Declaration for Original Invalid Pension" for Frederick Lehmann. State of Minnesota, Wadena County. 25 August 1877.

45. Minnesota in the Civil and Indian Wars: 1861-1865. Vol I. Pages 230-34, 309, 350-51

46. Folwell, William W. A History of Minnesota Vol II Page 174

47. Ibid Page 175

48. Minnesota in the Civil and Indian Wars: 1861-1865. Vol I . Page 230

49. Information provided by Adjutant General's office, Oct 24, 1877, in response to inquiries concerning Frederick Lehmann's pension application (pension No. 241381)

50. Carley, Kenneth. The Sioux Uprising of 1862. Minnesota Historical Society. 1976

51. Folwell, William W. A History of Minnesota Vol II p 177-182

52. Ibid p. 183

53. Carley, Kenneth. The Sioux Uprising of 1862. pp 18-20, 64-65

54. Ibid pp 65-68

55. Folwell, William W. A History of Minnesota Vol II: pp 183-185

56. Company Must-in Roll for Frederick Lahman, Camp Release, Minn., Oct 3, 1862. Remarks: "Prem. Pd// 2, Bounty//25"

57. Minnesota in the Civil and Indian Wars: 1861-1865. Vol I. P. 313

58. Folwell, William W. A History of Minnesota Vol II p. 192

59. Ibid p 194

60. Minnesota in the Civil and Indian Wars: 1861-1865. Vol I. p. 353

61. Ibid

62. Carley, Kenneth. The Sioux Uprising of 1862. P. 70

63. Ibid

64. Minnesota in the Civil and Indian Wars: 1861-1865. Vol I. . pp 290-291

65. Carley, Kenneth. The Sioux Uprising of 1862. Pp 72-75

66. Folwell, William W. A History of Minnesota Vol II p. 210

67. Minnesota in the Civil and Indian Wars: 1861-1865. Vol I. P. 353

68. Folwell, William W. A History of Minnesota Vol II p. 243

69. Ibid pp 249-251

70. "Certificate of Disability for Discharge" for Frederick Lahman of Co. F, Seventh Regiment.

71. Census 1860 Goodhue county, Cannon Falls

72. Marriage record of Frederick Lehmann and Mary Roller at Hastings, Minnesota. Oct 5, 1863 (supplied by Lois [Lehmann] Carlson.

73. History of Dakota County and the city of Hastings : including The Explorers and pioneers of Minnesota, by Edward D. Neill ; and Outlines of the history of Minnesota, by J. Fletcher Williams.. Minneapolis: North Star Pub. Co., 1881. Page 28

74. Minnesota State Census, 1865, Goodhue county, Cannon Falls

75. Census 1870 Goodhue county, Cannon Falls

76. Plat Map. Cannon Falls, Goodhue County, Minnesota. From Olmstead County Historical Society. Supplied by Lois (Lehmann) Carlson

77. Census 1870 Minnesota Dakota County Vermillion

78. Minnesota State Census 1875 Ottertail County, Oak Valley

79. Mason, John (ed) History of Otter Tail County. B.F. Bowen, Indianapolis. 1916. Pages 880-881

80. Lehmann, Louis and Carlson, Lois Lehmann. "Ancestry and Descendants of Frederick Lehmann and Mary Roller" (unpublished booklet prepared for the 1992 Lehmann Reunion at St. Paul, Minnesota)

81. All Goodhue County court records were researched by Lois (Lehmann) Carlson who supplied the pertinent information to the author.

82. Erickson, William. D. The Great Charity - Minnesota's First Mental Hospital at St. Peter, Minnesota. (History of St. Peter Hospital) 1866-1991 Downloaded 4 Nov 2009 http://www.archive.org/stream/ThisGreatCharity/THIS_GREAT_CHARITY_wmerickson_complete_djvu.txt . pages 70-71

83. Ibid pages 42 - 47

84. Mason, John (ed) History of Otter Tail County. Pages 880-881

85. Otter Tail County Plat Book. 1884. Otter Tail County Historical Society's archives.

86. Carlson, Lois Lehmann and Lehmann, Louis. "Ancestry and Descendants of Frederick Lehmann and Mary Roller' 1994

87. Christiansen, T. Minnesota: A History of the State and its People. Vol. I. The American Historical Society. Chicago. 1935. Pages 471-476

88. Census: 1900 Minnesota Wadena Wadena

89. Lehmann, Louis. "The Descendants of Frederick Lehmann" (Unpublished booklet prepared for the 1994 Lehmann Reunion at Elk River, Minnesota

90. Census 1900 Minnesota Otter Tail Oak Valley

91. Ibid

92. "Wadena Pioneer Journal" - Fiftieth Anniversary Number - 1927

93. "Wadena Pioneer Journal" May 13, 1898

94. "Wadena Pioneer Journal" - Fiftieth Anniversary Number - 1927

95. Zozel, Robert. A chronology of historical Wadena events is on file in the Wadena Public Library

96. Lehmann, Louis. "The Descendants of Frederick Lehmann" (

97. Cross, Thomas R. Colonel, U.S. Army, Retired " Memorial of Wayne Clifton Zimmerman"

98. Wadena Pioneer Journal - Sept 25, 1903

99. Census returns: 1900 - Minnesota Oak Valley and Wadena. 1910, 1920, and 1930 - Wadena.

100. Research by Egon Baumberger from Koppigen church books as per correspondence (May 18, 1996) between Egon Baumberger (Via al Funti, 6834 Morbio Inferiore, Switzerland) and Lois (Lehmann) Carlson

101. Koppigen civil records (Civil Register 1/49 & 1/185, Koppigen, Berne, Switzerland as researched by Franz Walter Kummer-Beck, Genealogisch-hist. Forschungen, Herrengrabenweg 3 CH-4054 BASEL for Lois (Lehmann) Carlson, 25 May 1992), 1/49 & 1/185.

102. Utzenstorf, Berne, Switzerland, Utzenstorf Parish Records (Christening Register), Vol 6, page 240.

103. Koppigen civil records (Civil Register 1/49 & 1/185, Koppigen, Berne, Switzerland as researched by Franz Walter Kummer-Beck, Genealogisch-hist. Forschungen, Herrengrabenweg 3 CH-4054 BASEL for Lois (Lehmann) Carlson, 25 May 1992), 1/185. .... Research by Egon Baumberger from Koppigen church books as per correspondence (May 18, 1996) between Egon Baumberger (Via al Funti, 6834 Morbio Inferiore, Switzerland) and Lois (Lehmann) Carlson.

104. Civil War Pension and Military Papers for Frederick Lehmann. Co. F. 7th Regiment. Minnesota. .... New York Passenger Lists 1820-1957 (Ancestry.com). .... Census 1870 Minnesota Dakota Hastings. .... Census 1880 Minnesota Otter Tail Oak Valley. .... Census 1895 Minnesota Wadena Wadena. .... Census 1900 Minnesota Wadena Wadena. .... Census 1857 Minnesota State Census. Hennepin county, St. Anthony. .... Census 1860. Chicago, Illinois. Ward 5. .... Census 1860 Minnesota Dakota Hastings. .... Gugen Griebfurts (Letter sent from Burgdorf (Switzerland), 11 April 1893 to Herr Theod. Guelich, Lawyer & Notary, 422 North Main St, Burlington, Iowa, North America authorizing distribution of fund from estate of deceased widow, Anna Weber born Baumberer who died on 29 May 1872 in Koppigen to her nephews including Johannes Baumberger (Frederick Lehmann) in Wadena.)

105. Wadena County. Clerk of District Court. 1903 Register of Deaths. .... Obituary of Frederick Lehmann. (Wadena Pioneer Journal. Sept 25, 1903)

106. Tombstone inscription in Wadena cemetery

107. Lehmann, Louis and Carlson, Lois Lehman, Ancestry and Descendants of Frederick Lehmann and Mary Roller (Unpublished booklet prepared for the 1992 Lehmann Reunion at St. Paul, Minnesota). .... Birth record of Mary Margaret Roller (Record provided by cousin, Lois (Lehmann) Carlson). .... Compiled by Christian M. Jaehne (Genealogical Research in Germany), Protestant church records - Kleinbettlingen and Bempflingen (Letter and copies of records sent to Lois Carlson 14 April 1992). .... Census 1860 Goodhue County, Minnesota. .... Census 1870 Minnesota Dakota. .... Census 1880 Minnesota Otter Tail Oak Valley. .... Census 1895 Minnesota Wadena Wadena. .... Census 1900 Minnesota Wadena Wadena. .... Census 1905 Minnesota State Census Wadena Wadena. .... Census 1910 Wadena, Minnesota. .... Census 1920 Wadena, Minnesota.

108. Obituary of Mary Margaret Lehmann. (Wadena Pioneer Journal. Oct 1926.) .... Tombstone inscription in Wadena cemetery. .... Death certificate Mary (Roller) Lehmann

109. Mason, John W, History of Otter Tail County, Minnesota : its people, industries, and institutions : with biographical sketches of representative citizens and genealogical records of many of the old families (1916) Volume: 2 (. Digitizing sponsor: MSN Book contributor: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center Collection: americana. Downloaded 7 Nov 2009 http://www.archive.org/details/historyofotterta02maso), pages 880-881.

110. Census: 1910 and 1930. Wadena Minnesota

111. Census 1900 Minnesota Wadena Wadena.

112. Ib id

113. Lehmann, Louis, "Descendants of Frederick Lehmann " (Unpublished booklet prepared for the 1994 Lehmann Reunion at Elk River, Minnesota).

114. Death article about John Zimmerman. (Wadena Pioneer Journal Dec 19, 1918).

115. Commencement Program: Univ of Minn. 1900. .... Wadena Pioneer Journal, Obituary (undated) of Albert Lehmann (Dec 1961). .... Census 1920 Wadena, Minnesota. .... Census 1910 Wadena, Minnesota. .... Newspaper clipping (undated ) Albert Lehmann + Mabel Boyd. (Wadena Pioneer Journal). .... Death certificate of Albert Lehmann. .... Birth certificate of Bryce Lehmann. (Copy owned by Lous Lehmann).

116. Death certificate of Albert Lehmann. .... Obituary of Albert Lehmann. (Wadena Pioneer Journal).

117. Wedding article. Albert Lehmann and Nellie French. Wadena Pioneer Journal. 1901 (Wadena Pioneer Journal. 1901)

118. Death certificate. of Nellie (French) Lehmann. .... Tombstone inscription in Wadena cemetery

119. Birth certificate of Bryce Lehmann. (Copy owned by Louis Lehmann).

120. Wedding article. Albert Lehmann and Nellie French.

121. Wedding article. Albert Lehmann and Mabel Boyd. Wadena Pioneer Journal (Wadena Pioneer Journal)

122. Census 1900 Otter Tail Oak Valley.

123. Minnesota: Census 1930 Hennepin Minneapolis. .... Census: 1920 Minnesota Wadena Wadena. .... Minnesota State Census 1905 Otter Tail Rush Lake.

124. Minnesota: Census 1930 Hennepin Minneapolis. .... Census: 1920 Minnesota Wadena Wadena. .... Minnesota State Census 1905 Otter Tail Rush Lake.

125. Census 1910 Wadena, Minnesota. .... Owner momgrizz1 (Public Family Tree Ancestry.com Downloaded 8 Nov 2009 http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/3686961/person/-1699038748). .... Minnesota: Census: 1920 Carlton co. Cloquet.

126. Owner momgrizz1 (Public Family Tree Ancestry.com Downloaded 8 Nov 2009 http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/3686961/person/-1699038748).

127. Census 1910 Wadena, Minnesota.

128. Information in the section "The Roller Family in Germany and America" was researched by Lois (Lehmann) Carlson and appeared in "Ancestry and Descendants of Frederick Lehmann and Mary Roller" by Louis Lehmann and Lois (Lehman) Carlson. This is an unpublished booklet prepared for the second Lehmann family reunion at St. Paul, Minnesota in 1992.

129. Family register for Phillip Frederick Roller family. Kleinbettlingen, Germany. Researched and shared by Lois (Lehmann) Carlson

130. Death record (1866) for John Jacob Roller includes birth date 30 Jan 1796. .... Compiled by Christian M. Jaehne (Genealogical Research in Germany), Protestant church records - Kleinbettling and Bempflingen (Letter and copies of records sent to Lois Carlson 14 April 1992).

131. Passenger List "The City of New York 13 May 1867 From Bremen.

132. Marriage record of Johann Jakob Roller and Anna Marie Reusch.

133. Protestant church records - Kleinbettlingen and Bempflingen Compiled by Christian M. Jaehne (Genealogical Research in Germany), Letter and copies of records sent on 14 April 1992 to Lois Carlson who then shared the information with Louis Lehmann .

134. Cannon Falls Plat Book Goodhue County 1877 (From Olmstead County (Minnesota) Historical Society). .... Protestant church records - Kleinbettlingen and Bempflingen. Compiled by Christian M. Jaehne (Genealogical Research in Germany). Letter and copies of records sent on 14 April 1992 to Lois Carlson who subsequently shared the information with Louis Lehmann).

135. Protestant church records - Kleinbettlingen and Bempflingen.

136. Ibid

137. Census Records. Troy, Perry County, Indiana: 1870, 1880, 1900, 1910, 1920, 1930

138. Census: 1920 Lower Town, Daviess, Kentucky.

139. Kieser Family Tree Owner adkieser(Downloaded 10 Nov 2009 http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/9113442/person/-849616232).

140. Lehmann, Louis and Carlson, Lois Lehman, Ancestry and Descendants of Frederick Lehmann and Mary Roller (Unpublished booklet prepared for the 1992 Lehmann Reunion at St. Paul, Minnesota).

141. Obituary of Anna (Roller) Colson. (Wadena Pioneer Journal. 15 Oct 1914). ....Protestant church records - Kleinbettling and Bempflingen Compiled by Christian M. Jaehne

142. Birth record of Mary Margaret Roller (Record provided by cousin, Lois (Lehmann) Carlson). ...Protestant church records - Kleinbettlingen and Bempflingen. Compiled by Christian M. Jaehne (Genealogical Research in Germany),). .... Census 1860 Goodhue County, Minnesota. .... Census 1870 Minnesota Dakota. .... Census 1880 Minnesota Otter Tail Oak Valley. .... Census 1895 Minnesota Wadena Wadena. .... Census 1900 Minnesota Wadena Wadena. .... Census 1905 Minnesota State Census Wadena Wadena. .... Census 1910 Wadena, Minnesota. .... Census 1920 Wadena, Minnesota.

143. Obituary of Mary Margaret Lehmann. (Wadena Pioneer Journal. Oct 1926.) .... Tombstone inscription in Wadena cemetery. .... Death certificate Mary (Roller) Lehmann.

144. Civil War Pension and Military Papers for Frederick Lehmann. Co. F. 7th Regiment. Minnesota. .... New York Passenger Lists 1820-1957 (Ancestry.com). .... Census 1870 Minnesota Dakota Hastings. .... Census 1880 Minnesota Otter Tail Oak Valley. .... Census 1895 Minnesota Wadena Wadena. .... Census 1900 Minnesota Wadena Wadena. .... Census 1857 Minnesota State Census. Hennepin county, St. Anthony. .... Census 1860. Chicago, Illinois. Ward 5. .... Census 1860 Minnesota Dakota Hastings. .... Gugen Griebfurts (Letter sent from Burgdorf (Switzerland), 11 April 1893 to Herr Theod. Guelich, Lawyer & Notary, 422 North Main St, Burlington, Iowa, North America authorizing distribution of fund from estate of deceased widow, Anna Weber born Baumberger who died on 29 May 1872 in Koppigen to her nephews including Johannes Baumberger (Frederick Lehmann) in Wadena.)

145. Koppigen civil records (Civil Register 1/49 & 1/185, Koppigen, Berne, Switzerland as researched by Franz Walter Kummer-Beck, Genealogisch-hist. Forschungen, Herrengrabenweg 3 CH-4054 BASEL for Lois (Lehmann) Carlson, 25 May 1992), 1/185.

146. Wadena County. Clerk of District Court. 1903 Register of Deaths. .... Obituary of Frederick Lehmann. (Wadena Pioneer Journal. Sept 25, 1903).

147. Tombstone inscription in Wadena cemetery.

148. Census 1870 Minnesota Dakota Vermillion. Census: 1880 Randolph, Dakota, Minnesota. Census Minnesota State census 1885 Otter Tail county Compton. Census: 1900 : Compton, Otter Tail, Minnesota

149. .Protestant church records - Kleinbettling and Bempflingen. Compiled by Christian M. Jaehne (Genealogical Research in Germany),).