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Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s
about James Brown

Name:

James Brown

Year:

1769

Place:

Maryland

Source Publication Code:

1229.10

Primary Immigrant:

Brown, James

Annotation:

Date and port of arrival or date of conviction for transport and port of arrival. Date and place of felon runaways are also provided. Name of ship and other genealogical and historical information may also be provided.

Source Bibliography:

COLDHAM, PETER WILSON. The Kings Passengers to Maryland and Virginia. Westminister, MD: Family Line Publications, 1997. 450p.

Page:

209

 

 

 

Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s
about Daniel Brown

Name:

Daniel Brown

Year:

1769

Place:

Maryland

Source Publication Code:

1229.10

Primary Immigrant:

Brown, Daniel

Annotation:

Date and port of arrival or date of conviction for transport and port of arrival. Date and place of felon runaways are also provided. Name of ship and other genealogical and historical information may also be provided.

Source Bibliography:

COLDHAM, PETER WILSON. The Kings Passengers to Maryland and Virginia. Westminister, MD: Family Line Publications, 1997. 450p.

Page:

210

 

 

 

Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s
about Joseph Brown

Name:

Joseph Brown

Year:

1769

Place:

Maryland

Source Publication Code:

1229.10

Primary Immigrant:

Brown, Joseph

Annotation:

Date and port of arrival or date of conviction for transport and port of arrival. Date and place of felon runaways are also provided. Name of ship and other genealogical and historical information may also be provided.

Source Bibliography:

COLDHAM, PETER WILSON. The Kings Passengers to Maryland and Virginia. Westminister, MD: Family Line Publications, 1997. 450p.

Page:

209

 

 

 

 

 

Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s
about William Brown

Name:

William Brown

Year:

1769

Place:

Maryland

Source Publication Code:

1229.10

Primary Immigrant:

Brown, William

Annotation:

Date and port of arrival or date of conviction for transport and port of arrival. Date and place of felon runaways are also provided. Name of ship and other genealogical and historical information may also be provided.

Source Bibliography:

COLDHAM, PETER WILSON. The Kings Passengers to Maryland and Virginia. Westminister, MD: Family Line Publications, 1997. 450p.

Page:

212

 

 

 

 

Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s
about William Brown

Name:

William Brown

Year:

1769

Age:

45

Estimated Birth Year:

abt 1724

Place:

Maryland

Source Publication Code:

1357.2

Primary Immigrant:

Brown, William

Source Bibliography:

COX, RICHARD J. "Maryland Runaway Convict Servants, 1745-1780." In National Genealogical Society Quarterly. Vol. 69:1 (Mar. 1981), pp. 51-58; vol. 69:2 (June 1981), pp. 125-132; vol. 69:3 (Sept. 1981), pp. 205-214; vol. 69:4 (Dec. 1981), pp. 293-300.

Page:

296

 

 

 

. Convict Immigrants

First consider those who arrived in the province already in trouble with the law: Convicts from England.
Some of our emigrant ancestors began their life in this country as convicts. Prior to 1717 the transport of convicts to the New World had been a small-scale enterprise. Early in 1718 the Act for the Further Preventing of Robbery, Burglary and other Felonies and for the More Effectual Transportation of Felons became law in Great Britain. The provisions of this law remained virtually unchanged until the Revolutionary War. During this period approximately 50,000 convicts were dumped on the American colonies.

The transporting of convicts was largely subsidized by the British government. Maryland and Virginia were the primary destinations. British prisons were cleared 2 or 3 times a year. By 1755 approximately 1 in 10 white adults in Maryland was a British convict! Lists of convicts destined to Maryland and Virginia were compiled by Peter Wilson Coldham and published in 1997 in The King's Passengers to Maryland and Virginia. Coldham gives the name, date of passage, name of ship, county of origin, name of exiting port and the number of years indenture.

These persons were to serve an indenture, usually for 7 or 14 years. Typically a contractor in England would take custody of the prisoners, and sell them to individuals in America. During certain periods the contractor was paid by the British government in addition to the monies he received from the buyers. It cost the contractor between 3 and 5 pounds to transport the convict and he then sold the individual for a significant profit.

Despite protests from the colonies about being a dumping ground for these convicts, there was nothing the colonists could do. Ben Franklin suggested that we return the favor by shipping rattlesnakes to England.

Because the convict frequently ran away, or changed his name after serving his time, tracing a convict can be difficult. Nevertheless, many people today can trace their ancestry to a British convict. A significant number became major landowners and leaders of the community. Coldham gives case histories of 23 convicts.