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Bowen family web

Bowen family web
Early Texas land grants


Long Texas flagLand Grants after Independence (1836)
Policies to attract settlers to Texas made land available in the Republic of Texas through headrights and military land grants. After annexation by the United States in 1845, Texas retained control of its public domain, unlike other western states, and continued to distribute its land. Before 1900, land was used by the government to secure and pay off debt, reward veterans, encourage economic development (including the building of railroads), finance the public schools, and even to build its state capitol.Altogether, more than 50 million acres of public land had been deeded by the time of statehood in 1845.

The basic laws for acquiring land from the Republic of Texas were passed in 1837 and put in place with the opening of the land offices in February of 1838.

The primary factors that determine the amount of land granted were the date that the applicant first entered Texas, and whether single or a married head of family (see Class Designations for Settlers of the Republic). Single applicants received less, but their original grant could be augmented if they later married, or if they were later joined by their family from outside of Texas.

The process for acquiring land in the Republic of Texas was :

An application was made at county of residence and a certificate issued.

The applicant located desired land which need not necessarily be in the county where the certificate was originally issued.

A survey was made, usually by a surveyor hired by the applicant.

A certificate was issued by General Land Office.

The grant could be conditional or unconditional, depending of the designated Class of the applicant. If conditional, the grant was subject to the applicant establishing residency in Texas for at least three years.

Notes:

(1) Unconditional grantees could sell or transfer their rights immediately; conditional grantees were required to establish residency in Texas for three years before an unconditional certificate was issued.

(2) Not an official designation; generally referred to as Class 2; reserved for volunteers for military service; the date of arrival requirements fell within that of Class 2 but the grantee received the amount of land and privileges of Class 1.

(3) In addition to the conditions imposed for classes 2 and 3, the class 4 grantee was required to cultivate 10 acres of the land on which he settled.

One result of Texas' generous public lands programs was the creation of extensive records documenting settlement in Texas--a wealth of information for historical research. These records include files on individual tracts of land, records of land certificates, claims files, maps, and many other useful sources of information about people and places in Texas.

Headrights (Republic of Texas, 1836-1845)

Headright grants were issued to indivuduals by Boards of Land Commissioners in each county.

First Class Headright

Issued to those who arrived before March 2, 1836. Heads of families received one league (4,428 acres) and one labor (177.1 acres), while single men received 1/3 league (1,476.1 acres).

Second Class Headright

Issued to those who arrived between March 2, 1836 and October 1, 1837. Heads of families received 1,280 acres, while single men received 640 acres.

Third Class Headright

Issued to those who arrived between October 1, 1837 and January 1, 1840. Heads of families received 640 acres, while single men received 320 acres.

Fourth Class Headright

Issued to those who arrived between January 1, 1840 and January 1, 1842. The amounts issued were the same as for third class headrights, plus the requirement of cultivation of 10 acres.

Pre-emption Grant

Similar to the headright grants, pre-emption grants were made after statehood. From 1845 to 1854 homesteaders could claim 320 acres. From 1854 to 1856, and 1866 to 1898, up to 160 acres could be claimed. Homesteaders were required to live on the land for three years and make improvements (such as building a barn) in order to qualify for a pre-emption grant of 160 acres.

 

Data from Land Records:


William F Bowen

First Arrived in Texas:

Class of Grant: 2 ( Issued to those who arrived between March 2, 1836 and October 1, 1837. Heads of families received 1,280 acres, while single men received 640 acres.)

Amount of Land: 640 acres

Date Conditional Certificate Issued: 2 Feb 1838

Conditional Certificate Issued in: Liberty County

Date Unconditional Certificate Issued: 2 Aug 1841

Unconditional Certificate Issued in: Liberty N. Dist. County


William H Bowen

First Arrived in Texas: Post 1 Oct 1837

Class of Grant: 3 ( Issued to those who arrived between October 1, 1837 and January 1, 1840. Heads of families received 640 acres, while single men received 320 acres.)

Amount of Land: 640 acres

Date Conditional Certificate Issued: 28 Oct 1839

Conditional Certificate Issued in: Montgomery County

Date Unconditional Certificate Issued:

Unconditional Certificate Issued in:

Comments: Head of family


Adam R Bowen

First Arrived in Texas:

Class of Grant: 3 ( Issued to those who arrived between October 1, 1837 and January 1, 1840. Heads of families received 640 acres, while single men received 320 acres.)

Amount of Land: 320 acres

Date Conditional Certificate Issued: 28 May1 839

Conditional Certificate Issued in: Montgomery County

Date Unconditional Certificate Issued: 17Nov1851

Unconditional Certificate Issued in: Walker County


Cordelia Bowen

First Arrived in Texas: Jul1837

Class of Grant: 2 ( Issued to those who arrived between March 2, 1836 and October 1, 1837. Heads of families received 1,280 acres, while single men received 640 acres.)

Amount of Land: 1280 acres

Date Conditional Certificate Issued:

Conditional Certificate Issued in:

Date Unconditional Certificate Issued: Jan 1846

Unconditional Certificate Issued in: Galveston County


John H Bowen

First Arrived in Texas: Nov1 839

Class of Grant: 3 ( Issued to those who arrived between October 1, 1837 and January 1, 1840. Heads of families received 640 acres, while single men received 320 acres.)

Amount of Land: 320 acres

Date Conditional Certificate Issued: 5 Dec 1839

Conditional Certificate Issued in: Nacogdoches County

Date Unconditional Certificate Issued:

Unconditional Certificate Issued in:


Smith Bowen

First Arrived in Texas: Aug1840

Class of Grant: 3 ( Issued to those who arrived between October 1, 1837 and January 1, 1840. Heads of families received 640 acres, while single men received 320 acres.)

Amount of Land: 320 acres

Date Conditional Certificate Issued:

Conditional Certificate Issued in:

Date Unconditional Certificate Issued: 26 Mar 1844

Unconditional Certificate Issued in: Jackson County

Note : from Jackson county records
Shows a Bowen on 1834-36 census : San Augustine district.

Jackson County records show this Land grant ( no date)
SYLVESTER BOWEN
LGE SYLVESTER BOWEN 1-16-8


Also see Texas Republic claims

Reference

http://www2.tsl.state.tx.us/trail/RepublicSearch.jsp

http://www.lsjunction.com/

http://www.glo.state.tx.us/archives/

1860 Texas

 

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