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Alexander McKee Family

Randolph County, Illinois, United States of America

Agnes (Anderson) Dodd

1.1.2               Agnes Anderson

                      b. 1834 Ireland

                      d. 1886 Woodchurch Hospital, County Cheshire, England

                      m. 1857 Audenshaw, St. Stephen, County Cheshire, England

                      Joseph Dodd

                      b. 1834 Ireland

                      d. Mar 1900 Ashton Under Lyne, County Cheshire, England

                     

          1.1.2.1  Sarah Jane Dodd

                      b. 1859 Dukinfield, County Cheshire, England

                      d.

          1.1.2.2  Fredrick Dodd

                      b. 12 Feb 1861 Dukinfield, County Cheshire, England

                      d.

          1.1.2.3  William Edward Dodd

                      b. 24 May 1863 Dukinfield, County Cheshire, England

                      d. 1866 Dukinfield, Cheshire England

          1.1.2.4  Albert Dodd

                      b. 8 Feb 1866 Dukinfield, County Cheshire, England

                      d. 1940 Ashton Under Lyne, County Lancaster, England

          1.1.2.5  Louisa Dodd

                      b. 21 Nov 1869 Dukinfield, County Cheshire, England

                      d.

          1.1.2.6  Robert Dodd

                      b. 3 Dec 1871 Dukinfield, County Cheshire, England

                      d.

          1.1.2.7  George Duncan Dodd

                      b. 17 Nov 1873 Dukinfield, County Cheshire, England

                      d.

          1.1.2.8  Agnes Dodd

                      b. 23 Mar 1876 Dukinfield, County Cheshire, England

                      d.

 

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Like her brother, the first record I can find for Agnes McKee is her marriage. She marries Joseph DODD in St. Stephen, Audenshaw, Cheshire, England. Visit this GENUKI website to see a picture of the church:

http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Ashton-under-Lyne/StStephen.shtml

 

Children quickly followed the marriage with the predictable spacing of every two or three years. The majority of the DODD children live to adulthood. One child, Fredrick DODD, appears to be deaf and mute, but it doesn’t seem to stop him from living his life. He works, he marries, and he has children.

 

One amusing note involves the christening of the children. All of the christenings take place at St. Michael's, Ashton-Under-Lyne, Lancashire, England. Visit this GENUKI website to see a picture of the church:

http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Ashton-under-Lyne/StMichaelandAllAngels.shtml

 

Fredrick and William are christened within a few months of their birth. However, with the arrival of child number four (Albert), the tradition appears to breakdown. And then, all of a sudden, on 29 October 1876, Albert and all of his younger siblings are all christened at once. One can well imagine that as Agnes’ family grew her ability to cope was strained. One can also imagine that children being children an incident occurred that caused Agnes and Joseph to get all of the children right with God by having the remainder of their brood christened en mass. We’ll never know but it’s easy to imagine the scene.

 

Joseph worked in the cotton mills as a weaver, eventually becoming an over looker of cotton weavers. As the Dodd children grow up, the older children (both the boys and the girls) work in the cotton weaving industry as weavers , cotton warp pickers, and over lookers. The younger children branch out into other pursuits. Robert is a beer seller in the Ring O’ Bells Inn and George, who is noted as having gone to school, is a clerk and later works as a cab driver groom.

 

As the lives of Agnes and Joseph play out, they are surrounded by their many children who have married had children of their own. Agnes and Joseph enjoy an old age that is filled with many grandchildren living in the immediate area.

 

Agnes dies in 1886 with Joseph following four years later. To date, I haven’t found grave locations for any of the DODD family. Perhaps later researchers will have more luck and/or more resources.